Cross-Cultural Understanding

News, August , 2007



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Editorial Note: The following news reports may be  summaries from original sources. They may also include corrections of Arabic names and political terminology. Comments are in parentheses.

Israeli occupation forces bar movement of Palestinians between eastern and central West Bank 

Saturday September 15, 2007 14:19 by Nisreen Qumsieh - IMEMC News nisreen at imemc dot org

Following the Israeli occupation forces complete closure of the Gaza Strip from last Tuesday, the Israelis have imposed even more restrictions on the movement of Palestinians. On Saturday, morning travel between eastern and central areas of the West Bank was halted. These restrictions, introduced for the period of the Jewish New Year celebrations (Ras Al-Sannah in Arabic, Rosh Hashanah in Hebrew), are expected to remain in place until Sunday.

Trapped Palestinians on Israeli occupation forces checkpoint

Israeli occupation forces hampered the movement of civilians by setting up fixed and mobile checkpoints on the roads between Jenin and Ramallah. Passengers have been forced from their vehicles whilst they are checked by the military.

Eyewitnesses reported that civilians trapped at checkpoints were forced to leave their cars and continue their journeys on foot, some carrying their children in the fierce heat.

As Israelis celebrate the New Year, Palestinians are observing the holy month of Ramadan, which began on Thursday. And yet it is ordinary Palestinians who suffer as they are forced to walk in the late summer heat as they fast.



Note to Readers:

The Israeli settlements as well as the Land-Grab, Apartheid Wall in the Palestinian occupied territories have been built illegally on confiscated Palestinian lands. These represent a major violation of international law, Geneva Conventions, and they obstruct reaching a peaceful resolution for the Palestinian-Israeli conflict.

The Israeli occupation forces abduct and kidnap Palestinians from their homes and at checkpoints, on daily basis. Most media refer to these abductions and kidnappings as arrests, which is inaccurate and not true as the Israeli occupation government has no jurisdiction over Palestinian citizens inside their own territories.

Further, when Israeli occupation forces kill Palestinian civilians, particularly when the victims are women and children, this should be referred to as an act of terrorism, and perpetrators should be described as terrorists.

Since the end of the second intifadha in 2005, not a single Israeli civilian was killed by Palestinian resistance organizations. However, Palestinian civilians have been killed by Israeli occupation forces, almost on daily basis.

Note to Journalists:

Any journalist who does not describe this as terrorism is biased, unfair, not objective, and a participant in terrorizing the Palestinian people, so the Israeli occupation of Palestine can continue endlessly.

Note to Translators:

The Arabic definite article, Al (or its variant, El) should be written with a hyphen separating it from the noun it is associated with, for example Al-Aqsa. If a hyphen is not used, as in Al Aqsa, it confuses non-Arabic readers. They may think that it is an abbreviation of the name Albert, as many Americans do.

The Arabic definite article Al (or El) should be written as such, whether it is Shamsiyah or Qamariyah in pronunciation, simply because we are dealing with the written form of the language, not the spoken one. Using the Shamsiyah so many forms in writing is inaccurate and confusing to non-Arabic readers, to say the least.

Only standard (fasih) pronunciation of Arabic names should be used. Non-standard ('ammi)  should be avoided avoided. Example: Names like Abu Sunainah, Abu Rudainah, and Abu Shebak are written by some translators in the non-standard forms of Abu Snainah, Abu Rdainah, and Abu Shbak.

The standard pronunciation of the vowel at the end of names is (a), not (e), particularly if it is followed by (h), like in the cases of Haniyah and Rudainah, not Haniyeh and Rudaineh.

The standard pronunciation of vowels in the following names is (ai), not (ei) as written by  some translators: Hussain, not Hussein and Hassanain, not Hassanein. This is the same long vowel pronounced in the English words "rain" and "brain."


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