Al-Jazeerah
Al-Haram Mosque in Makkah The Prophet's Mosque in Madinah . Al-Aqsa Mosque Compound in Jerusalem

 

Table of Contents 

I. Introduction: Basic Information  

1. Islam: A Brief Introduction   

2. Three Levels of Faith: Islam, Iman, and Ihsan   

3. The Scientific Evidence That God Exists and the Holy Qur'an Is His Message to Humanity   

4. Creation and Evolution in the Holy Qur'an  

5. Humans, As God's Caliphs on Earth  

6. Adam's Contest With the Angels, and Getting Out of Paradise

7. Worshippers By Choice Or Forced Slaves?   

8. The Relationship Between the Spiritual and the Physical Aspects of Islamic Teachings   

9. Mind, Self, Soul, Spirit, and Happiness from an Islamic Perspective   

10. Heart-Mind Relationship in the Holy Qur'an   

II. Islam: The Five Pillars of the Faith Structure 

1. Proclamation of Faith 

2. Performing Islamic Prayers

3. Giving Zakah (Charity) 

4. Fasting the Month of Ramadhan 

5. Making the Haj (Pilgrimage) Journey 

III. Iman: Allah, His Angels, Messengers, Messages, Latter Day, and Qadar 

1. Allah, As He Described Himself in the Holy Quran   

2. Angels

3. Noo'h, Noah, in the Holy Quran    

4. Ibrahim, Abraham, in the Holy Quran

5. Moussa, Moses, in the Holy Quran 

6. 'Eissa, Jesus Christ, in the Holy Quran   

7. Muhammed in the Holy Quran  

8. Prophet Muhammed's Night Journey and Ascent to Heavens, Al-Issra Wal Mi'raj

9. Latter Day (Day of Resurrection) 

10. Qada and Qadar: God's Foreknowledge and His Decree 

IV. I'hsan: Watching Allah in What We Say and What We Do 

1. Introduction to Islamic Law, Shari'a, Part I, Prohibition, Don't Do, and Do Commands in the Holy Quran

2. The La (No) Commands 

3. The Imperative Commands  

*** 

Articles with Islamic Perspective:

Health Care Crisis in the US: An Islamic Perspective

"Terrorism" & "Islamo-Fascism" Propaganda Campaigns: An Interactive Lecture

Six Questions About Islam, Muslims and Jews

Five Islamic Issues: Predestination and choice, position toward other religions, angels, and the End of Days

Food Islamic Rules and Teachings
 

Are Muslim women second-class citizens  

The French Ban on Islamic Headscarf, an Interview with

Links to Islamic Topics 2007-2010

Links to Islamic Topics 2007

Links to Islamic topics 2006

Links to Islamic topics 2005

Links to Islamic topics 2004

Links to Islamic topics, 2003

2002 Links to Islamic topics

 

 

Islam:

God's Message of Guidance to Humanity

III. 1.

Allah,

Praise to Him in His Highness

As He Described Himself in the Holy Quran

By Hassan Ali El-Najjar

13th of Jumada II, 1431 Hijriya, May 27th, 2010

Completed on 11th of Rajab, 1432 Hijriya, June 12th, 2011

Revised on 27th of Jumada Al-Oula, 1434 Hijriya, April 8, 2013

***

 

 

1431 2010

1432     2011

1434 2013  

Allah,

Praise to Him in His Highness

As He Described Himself in the Holy Quran

By Hassan Ali El-Najjar

13th of Jumada II, 1431 Hijriya, May 27th, 2010

Completed on 11th of Rajab, 1432 Hijriya, June 12th, 2011

Revised on 27th of Jumada Al-Oula, 1434 Hijriya, April 8, 2013

 

 

ۡ ٱ ٱٰۡ ٱ

 

A'oudhu Billahi Minashaitan irrajeem

Bismillah irrahman irraheem

 

I seek refuge with Allah from the stoned Shaitan
In the Name of Allah, the Beneficent, the Merciful

 

 

This article is About Allah, Subhanahu wa Ta'ala (Praise to Him in His Highness), as He has described Himself in the Holy Quran. It starts with some of the verses which deal with the topic directly, then a list of God's Good Names follows with interpretation of their meanings from some of the renowned Islamic scholars. The list assembled here by this author is different from the commonly known list in that it includes the Good Names of God which were mentioned directly in the Holy Quran. Other lists include concluded "Good Names" but without direct citation. As a result, a list of these concluded "Names," used in other lists, has been created but called here Attributes, rather than Names. 

This author is solely responsible for both the translation of the meanings of the verses as well as the summary translation of the interpretations of these meanings from the cited Islamic scholars. This is an introduction to the topic and there is no claim of covering it exclusively.

1. Al-Bassmala: The verse of mentioning the name of God

In Chapter 16, Verse 98 of the Holy Quran, Allah praise to Him instructs Muslims to "seek refuge with Him from the Stoned Shaitan (Satan)" whenever they start reciting the Holy Book. The "Stoned Shaitan" is a reference to the story of Ibrahim (Abraham), peace be upon him, who threw stones at Satan, when the latter was trying to dissuade him from obedience to God.

The very first Chapter of the Holy Quran, Al-Fatiha (The Opening), starts with Al-Bassmala, that is the verse of mentioning the name of God. It states: "In the name of Allah, the Beneficent, the Merciful." This is considered the first verse of the Holy Quran. All chapters of the Holy Book start with it except Al-Tawba (Chapter 9).

As a result, whenever Muslims start reciting the Holy Quran or start praying, they say: "I seek refuge with Allah from the Stoned Shaitan." Then they follow that with Al-Bassmala "In the Name of Allah, the Beneficent, the Merciful."

Allah: The God

"Allah" is the name which God has chosen for Himself, as stated in Verse 9 of Surat Al-Naml (Chapter 27), and in Verse 14 of Chapter 20 of the Holy Quran. He is the Creator of life, Who is worshipped by His creations as an expression of gratitude for His blessings, which include life, care, provision, and the promise of everlasting life in the hereafter for the righteous believers among them.

Allah, Praise to Him in His Highness, has created humans and jins to worship Him, as stated in Verse 56 of Surat Al-Dhariyat (Chapter 51). Though He does not need them to worship Him, He has commanded them to do so for their own benefit, as stated in many verses of the Holy Quran, such as 51: 57, 2: 272, 17: 7, and 22: 37. 

Allah, Praise to Him in His Highness, is so loving and caring of His creations that He sent them messages, through His Messengers, to show them how they can lead a happy life here on Earth and in the Hereafter. Basically, He told them to be good to themselves, to their families and relatives, to their society, and to the world. That is the essence of worshipping Him through proclaiming the faith, performing prayers, giving charity, fasting Ramadan, and making the pilgrimage. 

Each one of these ways of worshipping God has direct benefits to the worshippers, their societies, and their world. By worshipping their Creator, they enjoy happiness in this life and they please their loving and caring Creator, Who has promised to reward them an everlasting life in Paradise, in the Hereafter (More on the benefits of these ways of worshipping God can be found in other articles by this author, particularly The Relationship Between the Spiritual and the Physical in Islamic Teachings).

The word "Allah" means "the God," or "Al-Ilah." In addressing God, a Muslim may say in Arabic "Ilahi" (my God). However, Muslims usually refer to God with the definite article, Al, contracted with the noun it defines, to become Allah, thus addressing Him with "Ya Allah" or "O Allah."

The definite article (the) in Arabic takes two forms: "El" and "Al." While the latter, "Al," has been the standard in usage all over the Arabic-speaking world, some Arabs may use the "El" form in writing their last names, such as in the case of this author. However, most of the usage of the "El" form is associated with Andalusia (Arab Spain), and stayed in the Spanish language as well as the Spanish-speaking world until today, Such as in the cases of common names like El Salvador and El Paso.

Almost all usage of the definite article in the Holy Qur'an is in the "Al" form but there are three words in the Holy Qur'an, which include the "El" form. These are used in reference to the Prophet "El-Yass" (Elijah or Idris), his house (family) "El-Yassin," and Prophet "El-Yassa'a," with the Hamza under the Alef, for which the English vowel "E" is the correct translation (The Holy Qur'an: Chapter 6, Verse 85 and Chapter 37, Verse 130).

The definite article "El" was also used in the ancient Arabic dialect of Aramaic, spoken in the Holy Land of Baitul Maqdes, which was called Palestine at the time of Jesus Christ, Peace and blessings of God be upon him. The "translated" Bible tells us that Jesus addressed God the same way Muslims address Him today (Ilahi, or my God).

In Mark 15, Verse 34, Ps. 22:1, and Mat 27: 46, the "translated" Bible says: "And at the ninth hour Jesus cried with a loud voice saying Eloi, Eloi, la ma sabchtani (sabakhtani)? which was translated into English as "My God, My God, why has Thou forsaken me?" or "My God, My God, why have You forsaken me?" (Note: The Holy Quran states clearly that God has NOT forsaken Jesus Christ).

While "Ilahi, Ilahi li ma" are standard Arabic words, which are used and can be understood by the average educated Arabs, the verb "sabakhtani" is not used by average educated Arabs now. They may use other verbs, such as "taraktani" or hajartani." However, a noun derived from it is still in use. Many Arabs may refer to a deserted lot of land (as a result of being soaked with water or salt) as "sabkha." 

Apparently, the sound "h" in "ilahi" was deleted during one of the successive translations of the Bible from Aramaic to Greek, Roman, old European languages, middle languages, to modern European languages. 

It is noteworthy that Christian Arabs also refer to God as Allah in their Bibles, prayers, and daily discourse. A famous Christian Arab phrase is "Allah Mahaba," or "God is love."

This should be enough evidence for non-Muslims to know that the name of God (Allah) was used by messengers of God who preceded Muhammed (peace and blessings of God be upon all of them).

Rabbul-'Aalameen: The Lord of the Worlds, or The Master of the Universe

This good name of God is written as Rab Al-'Aalameen but it maybe pronounced as rabbul 'aalameen, rabbil 'aalameen, or rabbal 'aalameen, depending on its relationship to other words in a sentence, according to the Arabic grammatical rules.

It means "The Lord of the Worlds," or "The Master of the Universe," as stated in Verses 22-23, Chapter 26 of the Holy Quran. In this Verse, the Pharaoh asked Moussa (Moses), peace be upon him, about the meaning of "Rubbul 'Aalameen. Moussa answered: "He is the Lord of Heavens, Earth, and what is in between them.

So, there are worlds of angels in the Heavens, worlds on Earth (successive generations of people), and worlds of others in between the Heavens and the Earth. 

Rabbul 'Aalameen is the Lord of all these worlds of angels, humans, jins, and other creations in the Universe, that is in all of these worlds.

Al-Rahman, Al-Raheem: The Beneficent, The Merciful

Al-Rahman, Al-Raheem are  pronounced as arrahman, arraheem, as the definite article "Al" is contracted with the noun, deleting the letter ( l ) and replacing it with the first letter of the defined noun, ( r ).

The renowned Islamic scholars, Al-Qurtubi and Ibn Katheer, {1}  related explanations of these two characteristics of God from Abu Ali Al-Farisi and Al-'Arzami, may Allah be pleased with them, who said that Al-Rahman (The the Beneficent) is a reference to God's mercy to all of His creations, as expressed in providing them with what they need and enabling them to enjoy His provisions. However, Al-Raheem (The Merciful) is a reference to God's extra mercy to the believers.

While most translators of the Holy Quran agreed on the translation of "Al-Raheem" as "The Merciful," they differed in translating "Al-Rahman." The two most used translations were "The Beneficent," and "The Compassionate." This author has found that "The Beneficent" is a more accurate translation on the basis of the above-mentioned interpretation from the cited Islamic scholars.

 

ٰ ﴿١﴾ ﴿٢﴾ ﴿٣﴾ ﴿٤﴾ . ( 55: 1-4). *

 

A'oudhu Billahi Minashaitan irrajeem

 

Bismillah irrahman irraheem

 

Arrahmanu (1) 'Aallama alqurana (2) Khalaqa alinsana (3) 'Aallamahu albayana (4)  (Al-Rahman, 55: 1-4) .

(See Endnote  {2} concerning bold vowels at the end of each verse).


I seek refuge with Allah from the stoned Shaitan

In the Name of Allah, the Beneficent, the Merciful

The Beneficent, (1) has taught the Quran, (2) created the human (being), (3) taught him speech (Al-Rahman, 55: 1-4) .


Ibn Katheer interpreted the first four verses of Surat Al-Rahman (55:1-4), as a statement from the Beneficent, Praise to Him in His Highness, that He descended the Holy Quran to His worshipper Muhammed, peace and blessings of Allah be upon him (pbbuh), and made it easy to memorize and understand by believers. Al-Dhahak and Qutada, may Allah be pleased with them, added that He made the Holy Quran easy to be taught to believers so that they use it in telling the truth, enjoining the good, and preaching against the wrong doing. Al-Hassan, may Allah be pleased with him, interpreted it as enabling believers to pronounce its letters correctly, so that they can recite it in the best and most beautiful ways.

Al-Tabari added that the Beneficent extended His mercy to humans by descending His Holy Quran to guide them to success and happiness in this life and to help them avoid His punishment in the hereafter.

Al-Qurtubi mentioned the interpretation of Sa'id Bin Jubair and 'Aamer Al-Sha'abi, who said the letters of the name of Allah, "Al-Rahman," are the opening letters of thirteen Suras (Chapters) of the Holy Quran. These are "A, L, R" (the opening letters of Chapters 10-15 ), "H, M" (the opening letters of Chapters 40-46 ), and "N" (the opening letter of Surat Al-Qalam, Chapter 68). Together, these letters form the word, "ALRHMN," which is Al-Rahman, as Arabic words may include only consonants in basic writing, while vowels are added over or under a letter in the Holy Quran, but the vowels are not usually added in common writings, such as in books and in written media.

These first four verses of Surat Al-Rahman (55:1-4) tell humans of four blessings bestowed upon them by Allah, praise to Him in His Highness. The first verse tells them that Allah, the Beneficent, has mercy to all of them, as explained earlier above. The second verse tells them of His second blessing, which is descending the Holy Quran to humanity also as mercy and guidance for them to be happy in this life, as well as in the hereafter. The third verse is a reminder to them that Allah, the Beneficent, praise to Him in His Highness, created them in the best image, fashion, and proportions. The fourth verse is a reference to the blessing of enabling humans how to speak by creating the physiological features necessary to speech, and by blessing them with the suitable environment, as explained by this author in another article ( Creation and Evolution in the Holy Qur'an ).

***

2. Surat Al-Ikhlas: Chapter 112, titled "The Purity (of faith)"

ۡ ٕ

ۡ ٱ ٱٰۡ ٱ

ٱ (١) ٱ ٱ (٢) ۡ ۡ ۡ ۡ (٣) ۡ  ۥ ڪ ۢ (٤) ( 112: 1-4).

Surat Al-Ikhlas

(Chapter 112 of the Holy Quran)

 

A'oudhu Billahi Minashaitan irrajeem

Bismillah irrahman irraheem

 

 

Qul huwa Allahu ahadun (1) Allahu as-samadu (2) Lam yalid walam yooladu (3) Walam yakun lahu kufuwan ahadun (4)

 

 (Surat Al-Ikhlas, 112: 1- 4).

 

I seek refuge with Allah from the stoned Shaitan
In the Name of Allah, the Beneficent, the Merciful

 

Say: He is Allah, (the) One; (1)

Allah, the Eternal; (2)

He did not beget (give birth) and He was not begotten (given birth to); (3)

And there has never been anyone equal to Him. (4)

 (Surat Al-Ikhlas, 112: 1- 4).

***

Al-A'had, Al-Samad: The One in the Beginning and in the End, The Ultimate Provider

Al-A'had (also pronounced as written, Al-A'had. See the second endnote clarification ** for the meaning of the apostrophe) means the One who has nobody with Him in the beginning and in the end. He is unique in His characteristics. Nobody is equal to Him in these characteristics. For example, Allah is the ultimate source of mercy, love, care, compassion, and provision. Nobody is equal to Him in that. However, He encourages believers to be as merciful, loving, caring, compassionate, and providing as they can be (Surat Al-Ikhlas, Chapter 112, Verse 1).

Al-Samad (pronounced as As-Samad) means the Ultimate Destination for judgment and for help. He is the source of light, help, and provision. Whoever wants to get part of this divine characteristic needs to fast as much as possible following the path of the Prophet, pbbuh (i.e. several days every month, in addition to the month of Ramadan), or to eat, drink, and speak as less as possible. He/she  also needs to mention this characteristic of God, Al-Samad, as many times as possible during his/her day. This will empower the spiritual side of himself/herself and keep the body desires under control (Surat Al-Ikhlas, Chapter 112, Verse 2).

He did not beget (give birth) and He was not begotten (given birth to). This means that He has no wife, sons, daughters, father, or mother (Surat Al-Ikhlas, Chapter 112, Verse 3).

And there has never been anyone equal to Him. This means that nobody has ever been equal to Him in appearance or capabilities but believers aspire to have as much of His characteristics as they can, as mentioned above  (Surat Al-Ikhlas, Chapter 112, Verse 4).

3. Ayatul Kursi: The Verse of the Chair

 

ۡ ٱ ٱٰۡ ٱ

- ( 2: 255). 

A'oudhu Billahi Minashaitan irrajeem

Bismillah irrahman irraheem

  
Allahu la ilaha illa huwa alhayyu alqayyoom, la takhuthuhu sinatun wala nawm, lahu ma fee assamawati wama fil alard, man tha allathee yashfa'au 'aindahu illa bi ithnihi ya'alamu ma bayna aydeehim wama khalfahum, wala yuheetoona bishay in min 'ailmihi illa bima sha a, wasi'a kursiyyuhu assamawati wal arda, wala ya-ooduhu hifthuhuma, wahuwa al 'aaliyyul 'aatheem (Al-Baqara, 2: 255)

(See Endnote  {3} concerning the underlined sounds in the Quran translitaration).
 

I seek refuge with Allah from the stoned Shaitan
In the Name of Allah, the Beneficent, the Merciful

 

Allah! There is no (other) god but He, the Eternally Living, the Maintainer (in charge of all things). Neither slumber nor sleep seizes Him. His is whatsoever in the Heavens and the Earth. Who is that who (Nobody) intercedes in His presence except by His permission? He knows what is between their hands and what is behind them. And they do not surround a thing of His knowledge except whatever He wills. His Chair encompasses the heavens and the Earth, and it does not fatigue Him to preserve both of them (the Heavens and the Earth), and He is the High, the Supreme. (Al-Baqara, 2: 255).


Al-Hayyu, Al-Qayyoom: The Eternally Living, The Sustainer of the Universe

Ibn Katheer, may Allah have mercy on his soul, narrated that a number of the Companions, may Allah be pleased with them, were told by the Prophet, peace and blessings of God be upon him (pbbuh), that the Verse of the Chair (2: 255) is the greatest verse of the Holy Quran. It is also equal to one-fourth of the Holy Quran, sharing this characteristic with Suras of Al-Samad, Al-Kafiroon, Al-Zalzala, and Al-Fat'h (Chapters 112, 109, 99, and 48).

The Prophet, pbbuh, recommended reciting it before sleeping for protection from human devils and jin devils. Whenever it is recited at a home, it cleanse it from the devils who run away because it includes the greatest of all of God's names, Al-Hayyu, Al-Qayyoom. This greatest name of God is also mentioned in two other verses in the Holy Quran: 3: 2 and 20: 111.

Without relation to specific verses, Al-Hayyu means "The Living," and Al-Qayyoom means "The Standing." However, within the context of this verse, the two good names of God are complimentary to each-other, meaning that He is Everlasting and Eternal while all of His creations complete their records in this life then die, as explained by this author elsewhere  ( Mind, Self, Soul, Spirit, and Happiness from an Islamic Perspective ).


The four renowned Islamic scholars (Al-Tabari, Al-Qurtubi, Ibn Katheer, and Al-Siyouti) {1}, divided the "Verse of the Chair" into ten distinct Arabic sentences, and interpreted them mainly, as follows:

Allah! There is no (other) god but He, (means that He is the only God for all creations to worship).

the Eternally Living, the Maintainer (in charge of all things), (means that He was the First and He will be the Last. While His creations die, He never dies. His creations need Him for sustenance but He does not need anybody).

Neither
slumber nor sleep seizes Him, (means that He is the Maintainer of the Universe and the Sustainer of all His creations. He neither sleeps nor even slumbers for a moment. Thus, He knows everything, all the time).

His is whatsoever in the Heavens and the Earth, (means that He alone, without any partners, owns and controls everything and everyone in the Heavens and on the Earth, all are under His power, and all should worship Him alone).

Who is that who (Nobody) intercedes in His presence except by His permission?
(Nobody dares to intercede for others, that is, to  plead with God on behalf of His creations, who will be waiting in suffering for reckoning, on the Day of Judgment, unless Allah permits him/her to do so.

Al-Qurtubi mentioned that Allah, praise to Him in His Highness, will permit intersession by the Prophets, scholars, those who fight for His sake (Mujahidoun), and angels, as a way to honor them on the Day of Judgment. He will also allow good believers to intercede for other believers, as they prayed and fasted together in this life. A child may also be allowed  to intercede for his/her parents.

The greatest intercession will be permitted only to the Prophet Muhammed, peace and blessings of God be upon him (pbbuh). He will make a long Sujoud (prostration) until Allah tells him to lift his head and ask, and his call will be answered. The Prophet, pbbuh, then asks Allah to quicken reckoning, in order to relieve the believers from suffering under the heat of the son. The Prophet will be asked to do this job of intercession by all of the Messengers of God who preceded him, as they know that Allah loves him most).

He knows what is between their hands and what is behind them
(As an example of God's omniscience, His complete knowledge, is that He knows what His creations show and what they hide, what they do at their present and what they did in the past, what happens to them in this life and what will happen to them in the hereafter).

And
they do not surround a thing of His knowledge except whatever He wills (While God has complete knowledge about His creations, they do not know anything about His knowledge except what He wills for some of them, such as His messages revealed to humans through His Messengers).

His Chair encompasses the Heavens and the Earth, (Ibn Abbas, may Allah be pleased with him and his father, interpreted the Chair as God's knowledge. However, Abu Malik and others, may Allah be pleased with them, narrated that Allah, praise to Him in His Highness, sits on the Throne and puts his feet on the Chair. This part of the verse tells us about the size of the Chair, which is so immense that the Heavens and the Earth are like small pieces of coin encompassed in it. We cannot comprehend the size of the Throne, which is much larger than the Chair).

and it does not fatigue Him to preserve both of them (the heavens and the Earth),
(It does not tire or fatigue Him to preserve the systems of Heavens and the Earth, including taking care of whoever lives on them, and whoever lives in between them).

and
He is the High, the Supreme (Allah, Almighty, praise to Him in His Highness, is higher than the systems of Heavens and the Earth which He created, as the part of this verse about the Chair points to. He is Supreme and Mighty in His control of the Heavens and the Earth, which are just small pieces of matter, encompassed in the Chair under His feet, as He sits on the Throne, which is higher than the Chair and what is in it). (Al-Baqara, 2: 255).

  ***

 
4. Ayatun Nour: The Verse of The Light

( 24: 35).

A'oudhu Billahi Minashaitan irrajeem

Bismillah irrahman irraheem

Allahu nooru assamawati wal ardi, mathalu noorihi kamishkatin feeha misbahun, almisbahu fee zujajatin, azzujajatu ka annaha kawkabun durriyyun, yooqadu min shajaratin mubarakatin, zaytoonatin la sharqiyyatin wala gharbiyyatin, yakadu zaytuha yudhee-u walaw lam tamsashu narun, noorun 'Aala noorin, yahdee Allahu linoorihi man yasha-u, wayadhribu Allahu al amthala linnasi, waAllahu bikulli shay in 'Aaleemun (35)

I seek refuge with Allah from the stoned Shaitan
In the Name of Allah, the Beneficent, the Merciful

Allah is the Light of the Heavens and the Earth. The similitude of His Light is as a Niche, within which is a Lamp. The Lamp is in a glass (container). The glass (container) is as a brght planet. (The light of the lamp) is produced by fire from a blessed olive tree (oil), which is neither of the east nor of the west, whose oil would almost illuminate, without being touched by fire. Light Upon Light! Allah guides to His Light whom He wills. And Allah gives examples for people (as illustration), and Allah is knowledgeable of everything. (Al-Noor, 24: 35)

Interpretation of Ayatun Nour, or the Verse of The Light

Allah is the Light of the Heavens and the Earth. (Allah is the Light of the Heavens and the Earth and the Guidance for those who dwell in or on them. The Prophet, pbbuh, was asked if He saw God when he ascended to the Seventh Heaven. He answered: "I saw Light").

The similitude of His Light is as a Niche, within which is a Lamp. (The example of God's Light is like a lamp in a niche, a recess in a wall).

Ibn Massa'oud, may Allah be pleased with him, said that the light of God's Face lights (gives light to) the Throne permanently. As He exists above the Heavens and their solar systems, the phenomenon of day or night does not exist, and there is no need for any light besides His Light, praise to Him in His Highness.

The Lamp is in a glass (container) (as the glass container brightens the light, like the electric bulb in our time does).

The glass (container) is like a bright planet (as a result of having the lamp light inside it).

(The light of the lamp) is produced by fire from a blessed olive tree (oil), (The olive tree has been honored by being mentioned in the Holy Quran, as in this Verse and in Surat Al-Teen (Chapter 95). It is a blessed tree for the many benefits it provides people with, such as oil for cooking, lighting, messaging skin, and feeding hair roots. Its beans are also delicious after processing. Finally, the bean seeds are used as firewood for cooking and heating purposes).

which is neither of the east nor of the west, (which is in the middle of the olive grove but in a clear distance from all other trees, so it can receive the sun light all day, thus enabling it to produce the best and brightest oil. If an olive tree is in the east or in the west of the grove, it may not get the sufficient sun light all day; consequently, it may not produce the purest of oil).

whose oil would almost illuminate, without being touched by fire. (as a result of being produced by a tree in the best location, where it receives the optimal light from the Sun, as well as the optimal air and nutrients from the soil).

Light Upon Light! (This is a reference to the light of the fire and the light of the oil together, as interpreted by Mujahed and Al-Suddi, may Allah be pleased with them. However, other interpreters added that it is guidance from God upon the effort from the believer to learn the Holy Quran and apply it, as mentioned below).

Allah guides to His Light whom He wills. (His Light is His Message of Islam to humanity, which was revealed through His Messengers and was completed by the Holy Quran, through the Seal of all Messengers of God, Muhammed, pbbuh).

And Allah gives examples for people (as illustration), (So, they can understand).

and Allah is knowledgeable of everything. (Al-Noor, 24: 35)

The whole verse can be interpreted as the Light of God, as Ibn 'Abbas, may Allah be pleased with him and his father, said, or as the Light of the believer, as the four scholars also mentioned. Thus, God's Light is guidance to the believers, assuring them and reinforcing their faith to worship Him. It is like a lamp in a niche. The lamp here is the heart of the believer, which has been lighted with faith, and with learning the Holy Quran and the Sunna. These represent the sources of guidance to faith in God for the believer, just like the good, pure oil as the source for the lamp light.

Al-Qurtubi added that Allah, praise to Him, described the Holy Quran as a "Clear Light" in Verse 174 of Surat Al-Nissa (Chapter 4). He also described Prophet Muhammed, pbbuh, as "Light" in Verse 15 of Surat Al-Maeda (Chapter 5). Thus, the believer is guided by the Light of the Holy Quran and the Light of the Prophet Muhammed, pbbuh, (his Sunna). He further said that the Light of God in the heart of the believer is like the pure oil, which is about to illuminate (give light) even without fire touching it. As the believer learns the truth from the Holy Quran, his/her faith is reinforced, like the light of the olive oil when it is touched by fire; hence, "Light Upon Light."

In interpreting "Light Upon Light," Ibn 'Abbas said that it is a reference to good deeds of the believer, reflecting his/her faith in God. Mujahed and Al-Suddi, may Allah be pleased with them, said that it means the Light of God and the light of the lamp, or the light of fire and the light of the oil, or the light of the Holy Quran and the light of faith together. Al-Tabari interpreted it as light in the believer's speech, deeds, birth, death, and resurrection. His/her heart is as pure in faith as the purity of light reflected on a planet, making it beautifully bright.

The Holy Quran comes from God, pure and blessed, just like the lamp light which comes from pure olive oil. The Quran light and truth are so shining and clear that anyone with reasoning should be able to reach the level of faith in God and worship Him. Allah, praise to Him in His Highness, showed people a lot of evidence about Him before the Holy Quran. Now, after revealing it to humanity, it is light upon light, and those who saw the light, before the Holy Quran or after it, have no excuse not to believe in Allah, the Light of the Heavens and the Earth.

***

5. Verses Mentioning God's Physical Features

Allah, Subhanahu wa Ta'ala (Praise to Him in His Highness) is the
One, the Eternal, whom none has ever been equal to, as stated in Surat Al-Ikhlas (112: 1-4), mentioned above.

There is nothing like Him, as stated in Verse 11 of Surat Al-Shoura (Chapter 42).

 

 ۚ  ۖ  ۚ  ۖ  ( 42: 11).

Fatiru assamawati wal ardi, ja'ala lakum min anfusikum azwajan, waminal Ana'ami azwajan, yathra okum feehi, laysa kamithlihi shay on, wahuwa assamee'ul baseeru  (Al-Shoura, 42: 11).

The Originator of the Heavens and the Earth, (Allah), has made pairs for you from yourselves, and pairs of cattle, thereby multiplying (in the wombs of females). There is nothing like Him. He is The Hearer, The Seer  (Al-Shoura, 42: 11).

***

With that stated, several verses of the Holy Quran mention some physical features of Allah. Al-Tabari mentioned that the tradition of early Muslim scholars is to mention these physical features of God, as described in the Holy Quran and the Sunna without trying to equate them with the physical features of humans. Here are some of them:

First, Allah, Praise to Him in His Highness, has a Face, which lilluminates (gives light to) the Throne, as interpreted by scholars, in Ayatul Kursi (The Verse of the Chair) above. Believers direct their prayers and good deeds to the Face of Allah, as in verses 2: 115, 2: 272, 30: 38, 30: 39, and 76: 9 of the Holy Quran.

   ۚ  ۚ ( 2: 115).

( 2: 272).  

( 30: 38).

( 30: 39).

( 76: 9).

 
Walillahi almashriqu walmaghribu, fa aynama tuwalloo, fathamma wajhu Allahi, innAllaha wasi'un 'aaleemun   (Al-Baqara, 2: 115).

wama tunfiqoo min khayrin fali anfusikum, wama tunfiqoona illabtigha a wajhi Allahi, wama tunfiqoo min khayrin yuwaffa ilaykum, wa antum la tuthlamoona  (Al-Baqara, 2: 272).

Fa ati thal qurba haqqahu, walmiskeena, wabna assabeeli, thalika khayrun lillatheena yureedoona wajha Allahi, wa ola ika humul mufli'hoona  (Al-Room, 30: 38).

wama ataytum min zakatin, tureedoona wajha Allahi fa ola ika humul mudha'ifoona   (Al-Room, 30: 39).

Innama nut'imukum liwajhi Allahi, la nureedu minkum, jaza an wala shukooran   (Al-Inssan, 76: 9).


***

To Allah belong (the directions of) the sunrise and the sunset (the east and the west). Whichever (direction) you turn to, there is the Face of Allah. He is The Vast, The Knower (Al-Baqara, 2: 115).

Whatever good you spend is for yourselves, (provided that) you give it seeking the Face of Allah. And whatever good you spend shall be repaid to you (in full), you shall not be treated unjustly
 (Al-Baqara, 2: 272).

And give to the kinsman his due, and to the needy, and to the destitute traveler. That is best for those who want the Face of Allah, and those are the winners (Al-Room, 30: 38)

That which you give in Zakat (charity), wanting the Face of Allah, those (amounts) will be multiplied many times (for you in rewards)
(Al-Room, 30: 39).


'We feed you for the Face of Allah, we neither want a reward from you nor gratitude (Al-Inssan, 76: 9).


***
Second, some verses of the Holy Quran mention that Allah, Praise to Him in His Highness, has a Throne to sit on, such as Verse 3 of Surat Younus (Chapter 10) and Verse 54 of Surat Al-A'araf (Chapter 7).

ٰ  ۖ  ( 7: 54 ).

ٰ  ۖ  ۖ  ۚ ٰ  ۚ ( 10: 3).

 
Inna rabbakumu Allahu, allathee khalaqa assamawati wal arda, fee sittati ayyamin, thumma istawa 'aalal 'aarshi  (Al-A'araf, 7: 54).

Inna rabbakumu Allahu, allathee khalaqa assamawati wal arda, fee sittati ayyamin thumma istawa 'aalal 'aarshi, yudabbirul amra, ma min shafee'in illa min ba'adi ithnihi, thalikumu Allahu rabbukum, fa'abudoohu, afala tathakkaroona ?  (Younus, 10: 3).


***

Surely your Lord is Allah, who created the Heavens and the Earth in six days, then sat on the Throne (Al-A'araf, 7: 54).


Surely your Lord is Allah, who created the Heavens and the Earth in six days, then sat on the Throne, governing (His creation). There is no intercessor except by His permission. That is Allah, your Lord, so worship Him. Will you not remember?  (Younus, 10: 3).

Third, the Verse of the Chair (2: 255), mentioned above, tells us that Allah, praise to Him in His Highness, has a Chair to put His Feet on, as scholars interpreted above.

Fourth, Verses 26 and 73 of Surat Al-'Imran (Chapter 3), 64 of Surat Al-Maeda (Chapter 5) tell us that Allah, praise to Him, has Hands, extending them with provision for His creations and support for those who believe in Him.

 

 ۖ  ۖ ٰ   ﴿ 3: 26.

 ۗ    ﴿ 3: 73﴾.  

 ۚ  ۘ  ۚ  ( 5: 64).

 ۗ  ( 27: 63).

ٰ  ( 67: 1).

  Qul illa humma, malika almulki, tu til mulka man tasha-o, watanzi'u almulka mimman tasha-o, wa tu'izzu man tasha-o, wa tuthillu man tasha-o, biyadikal khayru, innaka 'aala kulli shay in qadeerun    (Al-'Imran, 3: 26). 

***

Say: 'O Allah, Owner of the Kingdom. You give the kingdom (governance) to whom You will, and take the kingdom (governance) away from whom You will, You exalt whom You will and debase whom You will. In Your Hand is good, You have power over all things  (Al-'Imran, 3: 26).

***

The four renowned Muslim scholars related three interpretations for Verse 3: 26.

First, it was interpreted as exalting Prophet Muhammed, pbbuh, by giving him the final and complete message of God to Humanity, as stated in the Holy Quran, after taking it from the Children of Israel, who rejected God's message delivered to them by Jesus Christ, peace be upon him. 

Second, it was interpreted as a reply to the Christian of Najran, in southern Arabia, who worshipped Jesus Christ as God because he showed miracles to the Children of Israel to persuade them to believe in him as a Messenger of God. In this Verse, Allah Praise to Him in His Highness is telling worshippers of Jesus that only God can exalt somebody to govern over a nation and debase another. Only God has power over all things.

Third, it was interpreted as an answer to the call of Prophet Muhammed, pbbuh, who asked Allah that Muslims conquer the Persian and Roman empires. This was fulfilled when the entire Persian empire was conquered by Muslims and the Persian Nation became a Muslim nation contributing to spreading Islam in Asia. Most of the Roman empire was conquered by Muslims, particularly eastern (Levant), western (Spain), and southern (North African) Mediterranean coasts. Only the northern Mediterranean stayed under the Roman rule until the rise of the Ottoman empire, when Greece and parts of eastern Europe became under the Muslim Ottoman rule.

***

 innal fadla biyadi Allahi, yu teehi man yasha-o, wa Allahu wasi'un 'aaleemun   (Al-'Imran, 3: 73). 

Waqalatil yahoodu, yadu Allahi maghloolatun, ghullat aydeehim, walu'inoo bima qaloo, bal yadahu mabsootatani, yunfiqu kayfa yasha-o   (Al-Maeda, 5: 64).

 waman yursilur riyaha bushran, bayna yaday ra'hmatihi   (Al-Naml, 27: 63).

Tabaraka allathee biyadihil mulku, wahuwa 'aala kulli shay in qadeerun    (Al-Mulk, 67: 1).

***

The bounty is in the Hand of Allah, He gives it to whomsoever He wills. Allah is Vast, Knowledgeable  (Al-'Imran, 3: 73).

The Jews said: "The Hand of Allah is chained." It is their hands, which are chained, and they were cursed for what they said. Rather, His both Hands are extended (with provision), He spends as He wills  (Al-Maeda, 5: 64).

And Who sends the winds bearing glad tidings between Both Hands of His Mercy  (Al-Naml, 27: 63).

Blessed be He in whose Hand is the Kingdom, He is powerful over all things  (Al-Mulk, 67: 1).

***

Fifth, many verses of the Holy Quran state that Allah, Praise to Him in His Highness, hears and sees. He is also described as Hearer and Seer, as well as The Hearer and The Seer.

There are 47 verses in the Holy Quran, in which Allah is described as "Samee'a" (Hearer)." There are 20 verses which describe Him as Al-Samee'a (The Hearer).

There are 42 verses in the Holy Quran, in which Allah is described as "Baseer," (Seer). There are three verses which describe Him as Al-Baseer (The Seer). These are Al-Isra (17 :1), Al-Shoura (42 : 11), and Ghafer (40 : 20).

In the following three verses, Allah, praise to Him in His Highness, states that He hears and sees:

 

 ۖ ٰ ( 20: 46).

 ۘ ﴿ 3: 181.

 ۚ  ( 58: 1).

 

Qala la takhafa, innanee ma'akuma, asma'u wa ara   (Taha, 20: 46).

Laqad sami'a Allahu qawla allatheena qaloo, inna Allaha faqeerun, wana'hnu aghniya on, sanaktubu ma qaloo, waqatlahumu al anbiya a, bighayri haqqin, wanaqoolu thooqoo 'aathabal hareeq (Al-'Imran, 3: 181). 

Qad sami'a Allahu, qawlal latee, tujadiluka fee zawjiha, watashtakee ila Allahi, wa Allahu yasma'u tahawurakuma, inna Allaha samee'un baseerun  (Al-Mujadalah, 58: 1).

***

(Allah) said: Do not fear (the Pharaoh), I am with you: I hear and see (everything)  (Taha, 20: 46).

 Allah has heard the taunt of those who said: "Allah is poor and we are rich!" We shall write (record) what they said and (write) their killing of the prophets without a right (to do so), and We shall say (to them): "Taste the torture of the (Scorching) Fire  (Al-'Imran, 3: 181).

Allah has heard the saying (statement) of (the woman) who argues with you about her husband; and she complains (in prayer) to Allah; and Allah hears your dialogue, Allah is Hearer and Seer  (Al-Mujadalah, 58: 1).

***

Finally, The human being has a face, eyes, ears, hands, and feet like his/her Creator, who created humans in the best image, as stated in Verse 4 of Surat Al-Teen (Chapter 95).

  ( 95: 4).

Laqad khalaqnal insana, fee a'hsani taqweemin   (Al-Teen, 95: 4). 

***

Surely We created the human (being) in the Best Image  (Al-Teen, 95: 4).

Al-Tabari, Ibn Katheer, and Al-Siyouti interpreted the last word of the verse, "Taqweem," as "Soorah," the accurate translation of which is "image." Al-Qurtubi also interpreted it as image but added that Allah, Praise to Him in His Highness, created human beings on His Image, the Best Image. They have face, eyes, ears, hands, and feet, as He has. They also have some of His traits, which are blown into them from His Spirit, such as justice, mercy, and compassion. He distinguished them from His other creations on Earth by walking upright, speaking, knowing right and wrong, and having the capability to choose between them.


Subhana Allahi, Rabul 'Alameen!

Praise to Allah, The Lord of the Worlds!

***

The Good Names of Allah

The rest of this article contains a list of the Good Names of Allah. Each name is referenced by citing some of the verses which contain it in the Holy Quran. Then, it is explained according to the interpretation of the four renowned Muslim scholars, particularly from Al-Qurtubi's famous book, Al-Asna (which is totally devoted to the explanation of the Good Names of God). Finally, a list of God's Good Names is reached, on the basis of direct citation from the Holy Quran that these are His Good Names as He has mentioned them directly in the Holy Quran.

Some translators translated "God's Good Names" also as "God's Most Beautiful Names."

There are many websites in Arabic and English which mention, list, or translate the Good Names of God. Some Arabic websites provide citations for the verses which mention them, as well as interpretations and explanations of their meanings. Others just mention one-word translation for each name without interpretations or explanations. Almost all of these websites use a traditional list which combines some of the Good Names of God (which are stated clearly in the Holy Quran) with God's Attributes concluded as a result of mentioning verbs or adjectives related to Him { 4 } .  

This author is providing readers with the following list, which is different from the above-mentioned lists in that it only includes the Good Names of God, which are mentioned clearly and directly in the Holy Quran, with citation for some of the verses they are mentioned in.  

The following list includes 117 Good Names of God. Some of them are variants of the same verb root but they are all authentic and clearly and directly mentioned in the Holy Quran. Thus, this list includes more of the Good Names of God than the traditional lists of the ninety-nine names.  

As observed above, the famous list of the Good Names of God includes some "Names" which are not clearly and directly mentioned in the Holy Quran. These "Names" were just concluded on the basis of some verses that describe God's actions or attributes. A list of these concluded "Names" is created here but called Attribute, instead of Names.

This is an effort to search for and study the Good Names of Allah, as we were instructed by Prophet Muhammed, peace and blessings of God be upon him. This author does not claim that his list is exclusive. Actually, he encourages other researchers to continue the work of finding and studying more and more of God's Good Names in the Holy Quran.  

***

The Holy Quran attracts us to the Good Names of God in the following four verses:

( 7: 180)

( 17: 110)

( 20: 8)

( 59: 24)

 

To Allah belong the Good Names, so call upon Him by them, and keep away from those who distort His names. They will be punished for what they do  (Al-A'araf, 7: 180).

Say: "Call upon Allah, or call upon Al-Rahman (The Beneficent), whatever (name) you call upon Him, to Him belong the Good Names (Al-Issra, 17: 110).

Allah! There is no (other) god but He. To Him belong the Good Names  (Taha, 20: 8).

He is Allah, the Creator, the Evolver, the Fashioner. To Him belong the Good Names (Al-'Hashr, 59: 24).

***

In a famous Hadith narrated by the Prophet's Companion Abu Hurayrah, may Allah be pleased with him, who said, the Prophet, pbbuh, said: To Allah, there are ninety-nine names, one hundred minus one. Whoever studied (and believed in) them would enter Paradise. Allah is One. He likes this witr characteristic (The witr is an odd number, such as ninety-nine - Author's explanation).

Shaikh Maher Bin Dhafer Al-Qa'htani ( http://www.al-sunna.net/articles/file.php?id=2970 ), commented on the meaning of this Hadith saying that it does not mean that the Names of God are limited to these ninety-nine Good Names. The objective is to encourage believers to study the Holy Quran and the Sunna, searching for the Names of God, learning about them, and observing the teachings learned from them. Thus, Al-Qa'htani would support Al-Tirmidhi's opinion (narrated by Ibn Katheer)  that the Prophet's above-mentioned Hadith did not list the ninety-nine Good Names, leaving it to the believers to search for them.

A List of the Good Names of Allah

The following is a list of the Good Names of Allah, as mentioned in the Holy Quran. There is no claim by this author that this is an exhaustive list, others may continue this task by finding more of God's Names in the Holy Quran. Muslims use the Arabic words in naming their children, with the word ('abd), which means "worshipper," as explained by this author in another article (Worshippers By Choice Or Forced Slaves? ). Thus, "Abdullah" means "Worshipper of Allah," and "Abdul Ra'hman" means "Worshipper of The Beneficent" and so on. Here is the list. { 5 } .

1. Allah: Allah (The God)

"Allah" is the name which God has chosen for Himself, as stated in Verse 9 of Surat Al-Naml (Chapter 27), and Verse 14 of Surat Taha (Chapter 20) of the Holy Quran.

The word "Allah" means "The God," or "Al-Ilah" in Arabic. In addressing God, a Muslim may say in Arabic "Ilahi" (my God). However, Muslims usually refer to God with the definite article, Al, contracted with the noun it defines, to become Allah, thus addressing Him with "Ya Allah" or "O Allah."

This Good Name of God was mentioned about 2669 times in  the Holy Quran, as in 1: 2. Because of the Arabic grammatical rules, a noun, an adjective, or a verb may take many forms. This means that the number of times of the Good Names of God mentioned in this article is not an exhaustive number  { 6 } .

The name of God (Allah) was also used by messengers of God who preceded Muhammed (peace and blessings of God be upon all of them), as was explained in detail above in this article.

  • 2. Al-Ilah: The God

  • "Ilah" means "God," The One Who is worshipped by His creations.

  • This Good Name of God was mentioned more than one hundred times in the Holy Quran. It is usually without the definite article (Al), and in reference to the other Good Names of God, as in 2: 133; 2: 163; 3: 62; 4: 171; 5: 73; 6: 19; 6: 46; 7: 59; 7: 65 and 7: 73.

  • 3. Ilah Al-Nas (pronounced as illah annas): God of the People

  • "Ilah Al-Nas" means "God of the People."

  • This Good Name of Good was also mentioned once in the Holy Quran, in 114: 3.

  • 4. La Ilaha Illa Huwa: No (Other) God But He

  • "La Ilaha Illa Huwa" means "No (Other) God But He," The Only true God in the Universe.

    This Good Name of God was mentioned seven times in the Holy Quran in 2: 255; 3: 2; 3: 18; 6: 102; 6: 106; 7: 158 and 9: 129.

  • 5. Al-Ra'hman (pronounced ar-ra'hman ): The Beneficent

    "Al-Ra'hman" is pronounced as "ar-ra'hman," due to the contraction of the definite article "Al" with the noun, deleting the letter (l) and replacing it with the first letter of the defined noun, ( r ).

    The renowned Islamic scholars, Al-Qurtubi and Ibn Katheer, {1}  related an explanation of this characteristic of God from Abu Ali Al-Farisi and Al-'Arzami, may Allah be pleased with them, who said that Al-Ra'hman (The the Beneficent) is a reference to God's mercy to all of His creations, as expressed in providing them with what they need and enabling them to enjoy His provisions.

    Some translators translated "Al-Rahman" as "The Compassionate." This author has found that "The Beneficent" is a more accurate translation on the basis of the above-mentioned interpretation from the cited Islamic scholars.

    This Good Name of God was mentioned 160 times in  the Holy Quran, as in 1: 3 and 55: 1.

    6. Al-Ra'heem (pronounced as ar-ra'heem): The Merciful

    "Al-Raheem is  pronounced as , ar-ra'heem, as the definite article "Al" is contracted with the noun, deleting the letter ( l ) and replacing it with the first letter of the defined noun, ( r ).

    The renowned Islamic scholars, Al-Qurtubi and Ibn Katheer, {1} explained the attribute of "Al-Ra'heem" as God's extra mercy to the believers. Thus, while "Al-Ra'heem" conveys the meaning of mercy and beneficence in this life, "Al-Ra'heem" coveys the meaning of mercy in the hereafter, as a reward to the believers.

    This author agrees with most translators of the Holy Quran on the translation of "Al-Ra'heem" as "The Merciful."

    This Good Name of God was mentioned 146 times in  the Holy Quran, with the definite article, as in 1: 4.

    7. Ar'hamu Al-Ra'himeen (pronounced as ar'hamur ra'himeen): The Most Merciful Among the Merciful

    This Good Name of God was mentioned four times in  the Holy Quran, in 7: 151; 12: 64; 12: 92; and 21: 83.

    8. Al-Malik: The King

  • "Al-Malik" means "The King." It conveys the meaning of absolute ruler over His kingdom. It also coveys the meaning of ownership of His Kingdom, which includes the Heavens, the Earth, what's in between them, the Chair, and the Throne. He is the King of this life and the King of the Hereafter.

  • This Good Name of God was mentioned four times in  the Holy Quran, in 20: 14; 23: 116; 59: 23; 62: 1.

  • 9. Al-Maalik: The Eternal Owner

  • This Good Name of God means that He is the Eternal Owner of everything. It is associated in the Holy Quran with more qualifiers, such as Al-Mulk and Yawm Al-Deen.

  • 10. Maalik Al-Mulk: The Owner of the Dominion

    The Good Name of Allah is mentioned in the Holy Quran three times, in 3: 26; 6: 73; and 17: 111. It means that He is "The Owner of the Dominion," Who gives it to whoever He wills.

    11. Maalik Yawm Al-Deen" (pronounced as maaliku yawmud deen): The Owner of the Day of Judgment

    The Good Name of Allah is mentioned in the Holy Quran twice, in 1: 4 and 22: 56. It means that He is "The Owner of the Day of Judgment," Who will judge His creations on that Day. 

  • 12. Al-Quddoos: The Holy

  • "Al-Qudoos" means the Pure in cleanliness and perfection. The Senior Angel, Jibril, peace to him, is described in the Reverred Quran as "Arrouh Al-Qudus," the Holy Spirit, in reference to his purity and perfection in conveying the messages of God to His human Messengers. Thus, "Al-Qudoos" is a reference to God's purity and perfection, or to His Holiness.

  • This Good Name of God was mentioned twice in  the Holy Quran, in 59: 23 and 62: 1.

  • 13. Al-Salam (pronounced as as-salam): The Peace

  •  "Al-Salam" means "The Peace." Allah, praise to Him, is Peace and the source of peace to His creations. His message to humanity, conveyed through His Messengers, peace be upon them, is the Message of Peace or "Islam." The Prophet, peace and blessings be upon him, ordered Muslims to spread peace by greeting people saying "As-Salamu Alaikum," which can be translated as "Peace be upon you."

  • This Good Name of God was mentioned seven times in  the Holy Quran, as in 4: 94.

  • 14. Al-Mu.min: The Believer in His Godhood 

    "Al-Mu.min" (pronounced with a glottal stop between the vowel u and the consonant m) means "The Believer." Allah, praise to Him, is "The Believer" in His Godhood. He stated that clearly in the Holy Quran, saying that He proclaimed that there is no other god but Him (3: 18).

    "Al-Mu.min" as a Good Name of God was mentioned once in the Holy Quran, in Surat Al-Hashr (59: 23).

    15. Al-Muhaymin: The Dominant

  • "Al-Muhaymin" means "The Dominant" over His creations, including humans, who are helpless before His Power. This attribute refers to God's ability to watch His creations and to record their secret and public behaviors. It also refers to his ability to run His Dominium or Universe in the perfect system He created.

  • This Good Name of God was mentioned once in  the Holy Quran, in 59: 23.

  • 16. Al-'Azeez: The Rare in His Might and Power

  • "Al-'Azeez" (the apostrophe before the letter "A" refers to the fifteenth letter of the Arabic alphabet, ('ayn), produced glottally) means "The Rare in His Might and Power." Nobody and nothing is equal to Him. His creations need Him but He needs nobody. See endnote # { 3 } for pronouncing a letter preceded by an apostrophe.

  • This Good Name of God was mentioned 64 times in  the Holy Quran, as in 2: 129.

  • 17. Al-Jabbar: The Compeller

  • "Al-Jabbar" means "The Compeller" who compels or forces His creations to follow His rules. Believers should strive to have some of this attribute of God by forcing their "selves" to follow God's rules, obeying His commands and avoiding His prohibitions.

  • This Good Name of God was mentioned once in  the Holy Quran, in 59: 23.

  • 18. Al-Mutakabbir: The Majestically Proud

  • "Al-Mutakabbir" means "The Majestically Proud," Who is Greater and Higher than His creations due to the perfection of His attributes and His existence. Believers, though, are discouraged to feel or exercise this attribute against other humans.

  • This Good Name of God was mentioned once in  the Holy Quran, in 59: 23.

  • 19. Al-Khaliq: The Creator

  • "Al-Khaliq" means "The Creator," The One who created the heavens, the Earth, and life on them. He brings everything from non-existence to existence. The underlined letters "kh" refer to the seventh letter of the Arabic alphabet. The letter "q" is the closest translation of the twentieth letter of the Arabic alphabet.

  • This Good Name of God was mentioned once in  the Holy Quran with the definite article and seven times without it, in 59: 24.

  • 20.  A'hsan Al-Khaliqeen (pronounced as A'hsanul Khaliqeen): The Best of Creators

  • This Good Name of Allah is a derivative of the same root verb /khalaqa/, the same for the Good Name of God "Al-Khaliq." It was mentioned in two verses of the Holy Quran, 23: 14 and 37: 125. In these two verses, Allah is describing Himself as "A'hsanul Khaliqeen," which may be translated as "The Best of Creators."

  • 21. Al-Bari': The Maker, The Curer

    Al-Bari' (pronounced with a glottal stop at the end) means "The Maker who makes one distinct thing from another." Allah, praise to Him, created every living thing from water and He created humans from clay.

    This Good Name of God, "Al-Bari'," or "The Maker" is mentioned in Surat Al-'Hashr (59: 24). It is also mentioned once in Surat Al-Baqara (2: 54).

    Another meaning of Al-Bari' is the Curer. Believers call on Allah with this name when they ask Him to cure them. Al-Bari', The root verb of this attribute of God is mentioned in Surat Al-'Imran (3: 49) and Surat Al-Maeda (5: 110).

    22. Al-Musawwir: The Fashioner, The Shaper

  • "Al-Musawwir" means "The Fashioner," or "The Shaper" Who fashions or shapes His creatures in proportions or forms suitable to their functions. "Al-Musawwir," as a Good Name of God, was mentioned once in the Holy Quran, in Surat Al-'Hashr (59 :24).

  • 23. Al-Ghaffar: The Forgiver

  • "Al-Ghaffar" means "The Forgiver," Who forgives the sins of His worshippers. The underlined English letters "gh" represent the twelfth letter of the Arabic alphabet, which is pronounced the same way Parisians in France pronounce the letter - r -).

  • There are two other Good Names of God deriving from the same Arabic root verb / ghafara /, to forgive. These are "Al-Ghafoor" and "Al-Ghafir," both of which convey the same meaning.

  • "Al-Ghaffar," as a Good Name of God, was mentioned once in the Holy Quran, in Surat Nooh (71: 10). This is the most expressive word for the characteristic of forgiveness, or Al-Ghufran, in Arabic, followed by Al-Ghafoor, then Al-Ghafir.

  • 24. Al-Ghafoor (The Forgiver), as a Good Name of God, was mentioned ninety-one times in the Holy Quran, as in Surat Al-Baqara (2: 173).

  • 25. Al-Ghafir (The Forgiver), as a Good Name of God, was mentioned once in the Holy Quran, in Surat Ghafir (40: 3).

  • 26. Ahlul Maghfirah (The Source of Forgiveness), as a Good Name of God, was mentioned once in Verse 56 of Surat Al-Muddathir (Chpater 74) of the Holy Quran.

  • 27. Wasi'u Al-Maghfirah (The Vast in Forgiveness), as a Good Name of God, was mentioned once in Verse 32 of Surat Al-Najm (Chpater 53) of the Holy Quran. In this verse, God's Attribute of Vastness is combined with His Attribute of Forgiveness.

  • 28. Al-Qahhar: The Subduer

  • "Al-Qahhar" means "The Ultimate Subduer," "The Ultimate Dominant," The One who subdues and dominates His creations with His power and ability, whether they like it or not.

  • "Al-Qahaar" as a Good Name of God, was mentioned six times in the Holy Quran, associated with His attribute of Oneness, as in Surat Yousuf (12: 39).

  • 29. Al-Qahir, as a Good Name of God, was mentioned twice in the Holy Quran, in Surat Al-Ana'am (6: 18; 6: 61). It is a derivative of the same root verb /qahara/, to subdue, dominate, or prevail over, as for God's Good Name of "Al-Qahaar."

    30. Al-Wahhaab: The Bestower

  • "Al-Wahhaab" means "The Bestower," or "The Grantor," The One who is Generous in giving. This Good Name of God was mentioned three times in the Holy Quran (3: 8; 38: 9; 38:35).

  • 31. Al-Razzaq (pronounced as ar-razzaq): The Sustainer

    "Al-Razzaq" means "The Sustainer," or "The Provider," Who sustains His creations and provides for them even without them asking Him for that. This Good Name God was mentioned once in the Holy Quran (51: 58).

    32. Khair Al-Raziqeen (pronounced as khairur raziqeen): The Best of Sustainers, or The Best of Providers

    This Good Name of God, was mentioned five times in the Holy Quran (5:114; 22: 58; 23: 72; 34: 39; 62 11). It is a derivative of the same root verb /razaqa/, to sustain, or provide, as for God's Good Name of "Al-Razzaq."

    33. Al-Fattah: The Opener

    "Al-Fattah" means "The Judge" Who rules between people with justice in the Day of Judgment, opening a clear path or distinction between right and wrong. This Good Name of God was mentioned once in the Holy Quran (34: 26).

  • "Al-Fattah" also has the general meaning related to the root verb /fataha/, to open. Thus, Allah, praise Him is "The Opener" of doors and gates for sustenance, power, and knowledge for His faithful worshippers. He is also The Opener of doors of mercy for those who repent and doors of knowing the unseen for his close servants, Awliya', as expressed in 6: 59 and 35: 2.

  • 34. Khair Al-Fatiheen (pronounced as khairul fatiheen): The Best of Judges, The Best of Openers

  • This Good Name of God, was mentioned once in the Holy Quran (7: 89). It is a derivative of the same root verb /fataha/, to open, as for God's Good Name of  'Al-Fattah."

  • 35. Al-'Aleem: The Knowledgeable, The Knower

  • "Al-'Aleem" means "The Knowledgeable," The One Who knows what humans know and see and what they don't see or know. He knows the Universe of the Seven Heavens that He Created while humans barely know about their planet and much less about their solar system.

  • This Good Name of God, "Al-'Aleem" or without the definite article " 'Aleem," was mentioned 162 times in the Holy Quran, as in 2:32 and 2: 29.

  • There are two more Good Names of God, which are derivatives of the same root verb / 'alima/, which were also mentioned in the Holy Quran. These are " 'Alim" and " 'Allam."

  • 36. 'Alimu Al-Ghaybi (pronounced as 'alimul ghaybi): The Knower of the Unseen and Unknown to Humans

  • This Good Name of God, which is related to the Good Name of God "Al'Aleem," was mentioned three times in the Holy Quran, in 34: 3; 35: 38; and 72: 26.  

  • 37. 'Alimu Al-Ghaybi wa Al-Shahada (pronounced as 'alimul ghaybi wash shahada)  The Knower of the Seen, Unseen, Known, and Unknown to Humans

  • This Good Name of God, which is also related to Attribute number 35 "Al'Aleem," was mentioned ten times in the Holy Quran, as in 6: 73.  

  • 38. 'Allam Al-Ghiyoob (pronounced as 'allamul ghiyoob): Knower of the Unseens and Uknowns  

  • This Good Name of God, which is related to God's Good Name of "Al'Aleem," was mentioned four times in the Holy Quran, in 5: 109; 5: 116; 9: 78; and 34: 48.  

  • 39. Al-Samee'u (pronounced as as-samee'u): The Hearer

  •  "Al-Samee'u," means The All-Hearing, The Hearer, The One who Hears all things, everywhere in His Dominion, whether it was whispering or a loud voice. Al-Tabari added that He is The Hearer of calls from the believers asking Him for help as well as The Hearer of non-believers who reject the revealed truth and make fun of believers.

  • This Good Name of God was mentioned forty-six times in the Holy Quran, nineteen times of them with the definite article and twenty-seven times without it. In sixteen of the verses, this attribute was followed by God's Good Name number 27 "Al-'Aleem," as 2: 127 and 2: 137. In three verses, it was followed by His Attribute number 32 "Al-Baseer," in 17: 1; 40: 20; and 42: 11.

  • 40. Al-Baseer: The Seer, The All-Seeing

  • "Al-Baseer" means "The All-Seeing," The One who sees all things, everywhere in His Dominion, whether seen by His creations or unseen by them. Al-Tabari added that He is The Seer, who sees the believers who will be rewarded for their good deeds. He also sees the non-believers who will be punished for their wrong doing.

  • This Good Name of God was mentioned forty-six times in the Holy Quran, three of them with the definite article, in 17: 1; 40: 20; and 42: 11, following His Attribute number 31 "Al-Samee'u.

  • 41. Al-'Hakeem: The Wise, The Perfect

    "Al-'Hakeem" means "The Wise," The One who is Perfect in what He does or says due to His perfect knowledge, which prevents any distortion or imperfection, as explained by Al-Qurtubi.

    This
    Good Name of God, "Al-'Hakeem" was mentioned thirty-nine times in the Holy Quran with the definite article (Al), as in 2: 32 and 2: 129,  and seventy-five times without it, as in 2: 209 and 2: 220.

  • 42. Khairu Al-'Hakimeen (pronounced as khairul 'hakimeen: The Best of Judges

  • "Khairu Al-'Hakimeen" means the "The Best of Judges," who rules over His creations by His judgment in the hereafter, rewarding the good doers by an everlasting life in Paradise and punishing the wrong doers in the Hellfire. In making His judgment, He does not neglect anything no matter how small it is. He also may choose to interfere in the life of people, helping the true believers when they are in need of His assistance against the tyrants of Earth.

  • This Good Name of God was mentioned three times in the Holy Quran, in 7: 87; 10: 109; and 12: 80.

  • There are also several verses in the Holy Quran which point to this characteristic of God, such as 40: 48, in which the reference to this Attribute comes as a verb in the past tense, meaning "ruled" or "gave judgment." In another verse (2: 113) the reference comes as a verb in the present tense, meaning "rules" or "gives judgment." In many more verses, God is .e One to Whom Belongs the Judgment," as in 6: 62.

  • 43. A'hkamu Al-'Hakimeen (pronounced as a'hkamul 'hakimeen): The Wisest of Judges

  • "A'hkamu Al-'Hakimeen" means "The Wisest of Judges," who rules over His creations by His judgment in the hereafter, rewarding the good doers by an everlasting life in Paradise and punishing the wrong doers in the Hellfire. In making His judgment, He does not neglect anything no matter how small it is. He also may choose to interfere in the life of people, helping the true believers when they are in need of His assistance against the tyrants of Earth.

  • This Good Name of God shares the same root verb / 'hakama /, to judge, with God's Good Name of "Khairu Al-'Hakimeen." It was mentioned twice in the Holy Quran, in 11: 45 and 95: 8.

  • 44. Al-Lateef: The Subtle, The Gracious to His Creations

  • "Al-Lateef" means "The Subtle, The Gracious to His creations, particularly His worshippers among them. He is Subtle as He sees and comprehends His creations but they cannot see or comprehend Him. Despite His Might, He is still Gracious to His creations, caring for them, and providing them what they need to survive.

  • This Good Name of God was mentioned seven times in the Holy Quran, twice with the definite article (Al) in 6: 103 and 67: 14 as well as five times without the definite article, as in 12: 100 and 31:16.

    45. Al-Khabeer: The Expert

  • "Al-Khabeer" means "The Expert," The One who knows the truth of things better than anybody else because He is the Creator of everybody else.

  • This Good Name of God was mentioned forty-five times in the Holy Quran, six of them with the definite article (Al) and the rest without it, as in 6: 18.

  • 46. Al-'Haleem: The Forebearer

  • "Al-'Haleem" means "The Forebearer, The One who is capable of punishing the offenders but He delays their punishment, willing to forgive them if they repent and ask for forgiveness.

  • This Good Name of God was mentioned ten times in the Holy Quran without the definite article, as in 2: 225 and 2: 235.

  • 47. Al-'Adheem: The Great

  • "Al-'Adheem" means "The Great," and "The Mighty," in His Attributes that none of His creations has. He is Great as the Creator of the Heavens and the Earth, which are just small peaces of matter compared to His Chair alone, as explained above.

  • This Good Name of God was mentioned eight times in the Holy Quran with the definite article (Al). These are 2: 255; 42: 4; 9: 129; 27: 26; 56: 74; 56: 96; 69: 33; and 69: 52.

    48. Al-Shakoor (pronounced as ash-shakoor): The Thankful

  • "Al-Shakoor" means "The Thankful," and "The Grateful," of His faithful worshippers. He appreciates their obedience and good doing by rewarding them with happiness in this llife and in the Hereafter. He is so happy for the believers who choose to worship Him and do good by choice that He is Thankful to them, expressing His thanks by promising them an everlasting and happy life in Paradise.

  • This Good Name of Allah was mentioned four times in the Holy Quran, without the definite article, in 35: 30; 35: 34; 42: 23 and 64: 17.

  • 49. Al-Shakir (pronounced as ash-shakir): The Thankful

  • "Al-Shakir," means the "Thankful" and "The Grateful" of His faithful worshippers. He appreciates their obedience and good doing by rewarding them with happiness in this llife and in the Hereafter. He is so happy for the believers who choose to worship Him and do good by choice that He is Thankful to them, expressing His thanks by promising them an everlasting and happy life in Paradise.

    This Good Name of God was mentioned twice in the Holy Quran, without the definite article, in 2: 158 and 4: 147. It shares the same root verb / shakara / with God's Attribute, Al-Shakoor.

    50. Al-'Aliy: The Most High

  • "Al-'Aliy" means "The Most High," in rank and existence. As the Creator of the Heavens and the Earth, He exists outside of His creations, higher than them and everything they contain. Al-Tabari supported this interpretation but added that He is higher in rank than His creations.

  • This Good Name of God was mentioned five times in the Holy Quran, with the definite article (Al), in 2: 255; 22: 62: 34: 23; 40: 12 and 42: 4.

  • 51. Al-Kabeer: The Great

  • "Al-Kabeer" means "The Great," The One Who is Great by Himself, independent from His creations.

  • This Good Name of God was mentioned five times in the Holy Quran, with the definite article (Al), in 13: 9; 22: 62: 31: 30; 34: 23 and 40: 12.

  • 52. Al-'Hafidh: The Preserver, The Guardian

  • "Al-'Hafidh" means "The Preserver," or " The Guardian," The One Who preserves or guards whatever and whoever He wants away from malfunctioning or from being harmed.

    This Good Name of God was mentioned once in the Holy Quran in the singular form, without the definite article (Al), in 12: 64. It was also mentioned twice in the plural form, without the definite article (Al), in 15: 9 and 21: 82.

    53. Al-'Hafeedh: The Preserver, The Guardian

    "Al-'Hafeetdh," means "The Preserver," The One Who protects His creations or preserve them away from harm.

    This Good Name of Allah is another derivative of the same root verb of "Al-'Hafidh."  It was mentioned three times in the Holy Quran, without the definite article (Al),  in 11: 57; 34: 21 and 42: 6.

    54. Al-Muqeet: The Source of Sustenance

    "Al-Muqeet" means "The Source of Sustenance" for His creations.

    This Good Name of Allah was mentioned once in the Holy Quran, without the definite article (Al), in 4: 85.

    55. Al-'Haseeb: The Reckoner or The Calculator

    "Al-'Haseeb" means "The Reckoner" or "The Calculator," The One Who calculates, lists down, and records actions and words of people, in order to be judged by them in the Day of Reckoning.

    This Good Name of Allah was mentioned three times in the Holy Quran, without the definite article (Al), in 4: 6; 4: 86; and 33: 39.

    56. Asra'u Al-'Hasibeen (pronounced as asra'ul 'hasibeen): The Fastest of Calculators

    "Asra'u Al-'Hasibeen" means "The Fastest of Calculators," or "The Fastest of Reckoners."

    This Good Name of Allah was mentioned once in the Holy Quran, without the definite article (Al), in 6: 62.

    57. Saree'u Al-'Hisab (pronounced as saree'ul 'hisab): The Fast in Calculation or Reckoning

    "Saree'u Al-'Hisab" means "The Fast in Calculation or Reckoning," in the Day of Reckoning.

     This Good Name of Allah was mentioned was mentioned eight times in the Holy Quran, in 2: 202; 3: 19; 3: 199; 5: 4; 13: 41; 14: 51; 24: 39; and 40: 17.

  • 58. Al-Kareem: The Generous

  • "Al-Kareem" means "The Generous," The One who provides His creations with much more sustenance resources than they need.

  • This Good Name of God was mentioned twice in the Holy Quran, in 23: 116 and 82:6 .

    59. Al-Raqeeb (pronounced as ar-raqeeb): The Watchful

  • "Al-Raqeeb" means "The Watchful," The One Who watches everything, everywhere, at all times.

    This Good Name of God was mentioned once in the Holy Quran, in 5: 117 .

  • 60. Al-Mujeeb: The Responder

  • "Al-Mujeeb" means "The Responder," The One Who responds to the calls of those who ask Him in need.

  • This Good Name of God was mentioned once in the Holy Quran, without the definite article (Al) in 11: 61 

  • 61. Ni'ama Al-Mujeeboon (pronounced as ni'amal mujeeboon): The Best of Responders

  • "Ni'ama Al-Mujeeboon" means "The Best of Responders." It shares the same root verb / ajaba / or / jawaba /, to respond, with the Good Name of Allah number 47 (Al-Mujeeb).

  • This Good Name of God was mentioned once in the Holy Quran, in 37: 75.

  • 62. Al-Wasi'u: The Vast

  • "Al-Wasi'u" means "The Vast," in everything, particularly in His knowledge, forgiveness, and wisdom.

  • This Good Name of Allah was mentioned nine times in the Holy Quran, without the definite article (Al). In seven of them, this Attribute of God was followed by his Attribute number 27 as "Al-'Aleem," (The Knowledgeable), as in 2: 115; 2: 247; 2: 261; and 2: 268.

  •  In one verse (53: 32), God's Attribute of Vastness is combined with His Attribute of Forgiveness (Number 17) to become "Wasi'u Al-Maghfirah," which means "The Vast in Forgiveness).

  •  In Verse 4: 130, this Good Name of God (Wasi'u) is followed by His Attribute of Wisdom, number 33, (Al-'Hakeem).

  • 63. Al-Wadood: The Loving

  • "Al-Wadood" means "The Loving," The One who loves His worshippers and is loved by them. Because of this love, He is Merciful to them.

  • This Good Name of Allah was mentioned once in the Holy Quran, in 85: 14. In the same Verse, He describes Himself as "Al-Ghafoor, Al-Wadood," (The Forgiver, The Loving).

  • 64. Al-Majeed: The Glorious

  • "Al-Majeed" means "The Glorious," The One Who is glorified for His generosity, power, compassion, and kindness.

  • This Good Name of Allah was mentioned in the Holy Quran, once without the definite article (Al), in 11: 73 and another with the definite article, in 85: 15.

  • 65. Al-Shaheed (pronounced as ash-shaheed): The Witness

  • "Al-Shaheed" means "The Witness," The One Who can see and hear everything so that He will be "The Witness" on our deeds and words in the Day of Judgment.

  • This Good Name of God was mentioned twenty times in the Holy Quran, without the definite article (Al), as in 3: 98 and 4: 33.

  • 66. Al-'Haq: The Truth

  • "Al-'Haq" means "The Truth," The One Who is true in His existence, word, and promise. He is the only lasting truth, while all other truths may be temporary and changing.

  • This Good Name of God was mentioned ten times in the Holy Quran, in 6: 62; 10: 30; 10: 32; 18: 44; 20 114; 22: 6; 22: 62; 23: 116; 24: 25 and 31: 30.

  • The word "Al-'Haq" was mentioned 191 times in the Holy Quran, meaning the truth but not as an attribute of God. However, in the above-mentioned ten verses, it was mentioned as His Attribute, praise to Him.

  • 67. Al-Wakeel: The Patron

  • "Al-Wakeel" means "The Patron," The One Who defends believers whenever He is called on, particularly when they are exposed to danger or injustice.

  • This Good Name of Allah was mentioned once in the Holy Quran, with the definite article (Al), in 3: 173, and 12 times without it, as in 4: 81; 4: 132; 4: 171; and 73: 9.

  • 68. Al-Qawiy: The Powerful

  • "Al-Qawiy" means "The Powerful," The One Who is more powerful than His creations. He owns the sources of power, and He uses them as He wills.

  • This Good Name of Allah was mentioned twice in the Holy Quran, with the definite article (Al), in 11: 66 and 42: 19, and seven times without it in 8: 52; 22: 40; 22: 74; 33: 25; 40: 22; 57: 25; and 58: 21.

  • 69. Al-Mateen: The Strong

  • "Al-Mateen" means "The Strong," The One Who is strong in His Power. Al-Qurtubi added that this attribute refers to physical strength. Other scholars explained it as having the strongest forms of power.

  • This Good Name of Allah was mentioned once in the Holy Quran, in 51: 58.

  • 70. Al-Mawla: The Guardian

  • "Al-Mawla" means "The Guardian," The One Who guards the believers and protects them.

  • This Good Name of Allah was mentioned once in the Holy Quran, in 47: 11.

  • 71. Al-Waliy: The Supporter

  • "Al-Waliy" means "The Supporter," The One Who supports believers and defends them.

  • This Good Name of God was mentioned twice in the Holy Quran, with the definite article (Al) in 42:9 and 42: 28. It was also mentioned once as "Wal," without the definite article at the beginning or the vowel at the end, in 13: 11. But it was mentioned many  times as "Waliy," without the definite article at the beginning, as in 2: 107; 2: 120; 2: 257; 3: 68; 42: 9; 42: 28; 45: 19; 4: 45; 3: 122; 7; 196; and 12: 101.

  • 72. Al-'Hameed: The Praised

  • "Al-'Hameed" means "The Praised" or "The Praiseworthy," The One Who is praised by believers for His blessings, provision, care, and love for His creations.

  • This Good Name of God was mentioned ten times in the Holy Quran, with the definite article (Al), in 14: 1; 22: 24; 22: 64; 31: 26; 34: 6; 35: 15; 42: 28; 57: 24; 60: 5; and 85: 8. It was also mentioned seven times without it, in 2: 267; 4: 131; 11: 73; 14: 8; 31: 12; 41: 42; and 64: 6.

  • 73. Al-Mu'hyi: Giver of Life to the Dead

  • "Al-Mu'hyi" means "The Giver of Life to the Dead," in the Day of Judgment.

  • This Good Name of Allah was mentioned twice in the Holy Quran, without the definite article (Al), in 30: 50 and 41: 39.

  • 74. Al-'Hayyu: The Eternally Living

    "Al-'Hayyu" means "The Eternally Living," The One Who is Everlasting and Eternal while all of His creations ultimately die.

  • This Good Name of Allah was mentioned three times in the Holy Quran, with the definite article (Al), together with the Good Names of God, "Al-Qayyoom," in 2: 55; 3: 2; and 20: 111.

  • 75. Al-Qayyoom: The Sustainer of the Universe

  • "Al-Qayyoom" means "The Sustainer," The One Who is Self-Sufficient in resources and capabilities to sustain and administer the system of the Universe He has created together His creations in it.

  • This Good Name of Allah was mentioned three times in the Holy Quran, with the definite article (Al), together with the Good Names of God, "Al-'Hayyu," in 2: 55; 3: 2; and 20: 111.

  • 76. Al-Wa'hid: The One

  • "Al-Wa'hid" means "The One," The One God Who Has no partners. He is not dual, or part of a trinity or plurality of Gods.

  • This Good Name of Allah was mentioned six times in the Holy Quran, with the definite article (Al), in 12: 39; 13: 16; 14: 48; 38: 65: 39: 4; and 40: 16. It was also mentioned sixteen times without it, as in 2: 133; 2: 163: 4: 17; 5: 73: 6: 19; and 9: 31.

  • This Good Name of God is related to His two other Good Names,  "Al-A'had" and "Al-Samad."

  • 77. Al-A'had: The Uniquely One

    This Good Name of Allah was mentioned once in the Holy Quran, without the definite article (Al), in 112: 1.

  • "Al-A'had" means "The Uniquely One," in His nature. He did not beget (give birth) and He was not begotten (given birth to); And there has never been anyone equal to Him, as He states in Surat Al-Ikhlas, 112: 1-4.

  • This means that He has no wife, sons, daughters, father, or mother. Nobody has ever been equal to Him in appearance or capabilities. "Al-A'had" also means "The One" Who had nobody with Him in the beginning and nobody will be with Him in the end.

  • 78. Al-Samad (pronounced as as-samad): The Ultimate Provider

  • "Al-Samad" means "The Ultimate Provider." He is the Ultimate Destination for judgment and for help, the source of light, help, and provision.

    This Good Name of Allah was mentioned once in the Holy Quran, with the definite article (Al), in 112: 1.

  • 79. Al-Qadir: The Able, The Capable

  • "Al-Qadir" means "The Able," The One Who is Capable of anything and everything, including rewarding obedient believers and punishing disobedient nonbelievers.

  • This Good Name of Allah was mentioned eleven times in the Holy Quran, once with the definite article (Al), in 6: 65, five times in the plural form, without the definite article, "Qadiroon" or "Qadireen," in 23: 18; 23: 95; 68: 25; 70: 40; 75: 4; and five times in the singular form, "Qadir," without the definite article, in 6: 37; 17; 99; 36; 81: 46; 33; 75: 40; and 86: 8.

    80. Al-Muqtadir: The Capable

  • "Al-Muqtadir" means "The Capable," The One Who is Capable of anything and everything, including rewarding obedient believers and punishing disobedient nonbelievers. It shares the same root verb /qadara / of the Good Name of God, "Al-Qadir."

  • This Good Name of Allah was mentioned four times in the Holy Quran, without the definite article (Al), one of them in the plural form (43: 42) and three in the singular form, in 18: 45; 43: 42; 54: 42; and 54: 55.

  • 81. Al-Qadeer: The Capable

  • Al-Qadeer: The Capable

  • This Good Name of Allah was mentioned forty-six times in the Holy Quran, without the definite article (Al), in most of them it was associated with the ability of God to do everything, as in 2: 20; 2: 106; 2: 109; 2: 148; 2: 259; and 2: 284.

  • 82. Ni'ama Al-Qadiroon (pronounced as ni'amal qadiroon): The Best of Capables

  • "Ni'ama Al-Qadiroon" means "The Best of Capables." It shares the same root verb / qadira /, to be able or capable, with the Good Name of Allah number 65 (Al-Qadir).

  • This Good Name of God was mentioned once in the Holy Quran, in 77: 23.

  • "Al-Awwal" means "The First," The One Who has been in existence from the beginning.

  • This Good Name of God was mentioned once in the Holy Quran, with the definite article (Al), in 57: 3.

  • 84. Al-Akhir: The Last

  • "Al-Akhir" means "The Last," The One Who stays last in existence after all His creations perish.

  • This Good Name of God was mentioned once in the Holy Quran, with the definite article (Al), in 57: 3.

  • 85. Al-Dhahir: The Manifest

  • "Al-Dhahir" means "The Manifest," The One Who is obvious to the minds of His creations through His signs and  capabilities.

  • This Good Name of God was mentioned once in the Holy Quran, with the definite article (Al), in 57: 3.

  • 86. Al-Batin: The Latent

  • "Al-Batin" means "The Latent," The One Who is capable of becoming present though not obvious to the minds of His creations.

  • This Good Name of God was mentioned once in the Holy Quran, with the definite article (Al), in 57: 3.

  • 83. Al-Awwal: The First

    87. Al-Muta'al: The Higher (than His creations)

    "Al-Muta'al" is another Good Name of God having the same characteristic of Highness as "Al-'Aliy." It means that Allah, praise to Him in His Highness, is "Higher" in rank and existence than all of His creations. As the Creator of the Heavens and the Earth, He exists outside of His creations, higher than them and everything they contain.

    This Good Name of Allah was mentioned once in the Holy Quran, in 13: 9.

    88. Al-Barr: The Source of Goodness and Kindness

  • "Al-Barr" means "The Source of All Goodness and Kindness," The One Who is kind to His creatures by providing them with  His sustenance, provision, care, and mercy. Al-Tabari and Al-Qurtubi explained this Attribute of God as His Kindness to the beliervers. Ibn Katheer added that it is a reference to forgiving the believers who call on Him for salvation.

  • This Good Name of Allah was mentioned once in the Holy Quran, with the definite article (Al), in 52: 28.

  • 89. Al-Tawwab (pronounced as at-tawwab): The Acceptor of Repentance

  • "Al-Tawwab" means "The Acceptor of Repentance," The One Who accepts repentance of His worshippers who return to Him.

  • This Good Name of Allah was mentioned six times in the Holy Quran, with the definite article (Al), associated with His Attribute of Mercy, in 2: 37; 2: 54; 2: 128; 2: 160; 9: 104; and 9: 118. It was also mentioned five times without it, in  4: 16; 4: 64; 24: 10; 49: 12; and 110: 3.

  • 90. Al-Muntaqim: The Avenger

  • The Avenger, The One Who exacts punishment on the oppressors for their transgression against the believers, and their disobedience to Him.

  • This Good Name of God was mentioned three times in the Holy Quran, in the honorific plural form, without the definite article (Al), in 32: 22; 43: 41; 44 16.

  • 91. Al-'Afuw: The Pardoner

  • "Al-'Afuw" means "The Pardoner," "The Forgiver," The One Who removes or deletes the sins of repentant worshippers from their records. So, they won't be punished for them in the Day of Judgment.

  • This Good Name of God was mentioned five times in the Holy Quran, in the honorific plural form, without the definite article (Al), in 4: 43; 4: 99; 4: 149; 22: 60; and 58: 2.

  • 92. Al-Ra'ouf (pronounced as ar-ra'ouf): The Extremely Merciful

  • "Al-Ra'ouf" means "The Extremely Merciful" to all of His creations. He is more merciful to people than a mother to her infant.

  • This Good Name of God was mentioned eleven times in the Holy Quran, without the definite article (Al), in 2: 207; 3: 30; 9: 117; 9: 128; 24: 20; 59: 10; 2: 143; 15: 7; 16: 47; 22: 65; and 57: 9.

  • 93. Al-Jaami'u: The Gatherer

  • "Al-Jaami'u" means "The Gatherer," The One Who gathers people for reckoning in the Day of Judgment and Who gathers hypocrites and non-believers in the Hellfire.

  •  This Good Name of God was mentioned twice in the Holy Quran, without the definite article (Al), in 3: 9 and 4: 140.

  • 94. Al-Ghaniy: The Rich

  • "Al-Ghaniy" means "The Rich," "The Self-Sufficient," The One Who does not need His creations.

  • This Good Name of God was mentioned eight times in the Holy Quran, with the definite article (Al), as in 6: 133 and 10: 68. It was also mentioned eleven times without it, as in 2: 263; 2: 267; and 273.

  • 95.  Al-Noor (pronounced as an-noor): The Light

  • "Al-Noor" means "The Light." Allah is the Light of the Heavens and the Earth and the Guidance for those who dwell in or on them. The Prophet, pbbuh, was asked if He saw God when he ascended to the Seventh Heaven. He answered: "I saw Light").

  • This Good Name of God was mentioned once in the Holy Quran, without the definite article (Al), in 24: 35. It was also mentioned as the "Light" of God in 39: 69. However, the word "Noor" (Light) was used to describe the Holy Quran in seven verses, as in 4: 174; 5: 15; and 7: 157.

    96. Al-Hadi: The Guide

  • "Al-Hadi" means "The Guide," The One Who guides the living beings to what is beneficial for them.

  • This Good Name of God was mentioned once in the Holy Quran, without the definite article (Al), in 25: 31.

  • 97. Al-Badee'u: The Creative

    "Al-Badee'u" means "The Creative," The One Who has created heaves and the Earth in a unique way, without parallels to His creations.

  • This Good Name of Allah was mentioned twice in the Holy Quran, in 2: 117 and 6: 101.

  • 98. Al-Warith: The Inheritor

  • "Al-Warith" means "The Inheritor," The One inherits His creations in Heavens and on Earth, as they are all going to perish.

  • This Good Name of God was mentioned three times in the Holy Quran, in the honorific plural form, with the definite article (Al), in 15: 23; 23: 10 and 28: 58.

  • 99. Khairu Al-Waritheen (pronounced as khairul waritheen): The Best of Inheritors

  • "Khairu Al-Waritheen" means "The Best of Inheritors," The One inherits His creations in Heavens and on Earth, as they are all going to perish.

  • This Good Name of God was mentioned once in the Holy Quran, in the honorific plural form, with the definite article (Al), in 21: 89.

  • 100. Al-Fatir: The Originator

    "Al-Fatir" means "The Originator," Who created the Heavens and the Earth, as well as life, in an original way.

    This Good Name of Allah was mentioned six times in the Holy Quran, in 6: 14; 12: 10; 14: 10; 35: 1; 39: 46; and 42: 11.

    101. Al-Khair: The Good

    "Al-Khair" means "The Good," The One Who is Good to His creations, caring, loving, providing, and guiding them.

    This Good Name of Allah was mentioned was mentioned once in the Holy Quran, in 20: 73.

    102: Al-Abqa: The Everlasting

    "Al-Abqa" means "The Everlasting," The One Who lasts while everybody and everything have an end as they have a beginning.

    This Good Name of Allah was mentioned was mentioned once in the Holy Quran, in 20: 73.

    103. Dhul Ma'aarij: The One to Whom Belongs the Ascents

    "Dhul Ma'aarij" means "The One to Whom Belongs the Ascents." This is a reference to God as Highest, where angels and the Senior Angel, Jibril, ascend to Him through the various heavens, thus the "Ascents."

    This Good Name of Allah was mentioned once in the Holy Quran, in 70: 3.

  • 104. Dhu Al-Quwah, Al-Mateen (pronounced as dhul quwah, al-mateen):

  • The One With Power, the Strong

  • "Dhu Al-Quwah" means "The One With Power," or "The One to Whom the Power Belongs."

  • This Good Name of Allah was mentioned once in the Holy Quran, in 51: 58.

  • 105. Dhu Al-'Arsh (pronounced as dhul-'arsh): The One to Whom Belongs the Throne

    "Dhu Al-'Arsh" means "The One to Whom Belongs the Throne," which is described in Verse of the Chair above. Creation and possession of the Throne is a symobol of His Ownership of His Kingdom.

    This Good Name of Allah was mentioned twice in the Holy Quran, in 40: 15 and 85: 15.

    106. Dhu Al-Jalal Wa Al-Ikram (pronounced as  Dhul-Jalali wal-Ikram): The One to Whom Belongs the Majesty and Generosity

  • "Dhul-Jalali wal-Ikram" means "The One to Whom Belongs the Majesty and Generosity.

  • This Good Name of Allah was mentioned twice in the Holy Quran, in 55: 27 and 55: 78.

    107. Rafee'u Al-Darajat (pronounced as rafee'ud-darajat): The High in Ranks

  • "Rafee'u Al-Darajat" means "The High in Ranks," The One Who is High in Attributes and physical location above His creations, including the Heavens and the Earth.

    This Good Name of Allah was mentioned once in the Holy Quran, in 40: 15.

  • 108. Laysa Kamithlihi Shay.un: Nothing Is Like Him

  • "Laysa Kamithlihi Shay.un" means "Nothing Is Like Him." This is in answering those who claim that humans look like God.

  • This Good Name of Allah was mentioned once in the Holy Quran, in 42: 11.

  • 109. Al-Rab: The Lord

    "Al-Rab" means "The Lord," The One Who is the Worshipped Master.

    This Good Name of God was mentioned so many times in the Holy Quran that its conjugated forms fill thirteen pages of the Arabic index of the Holy Quran, without the definite article (Al), as in 1: 1; 7: 54; 10: 3; 12: 100; 13: 2; 39: 75; and 40: 7.

    110. Rab Al-'Arsh (pronounced as rabul 'arsh):The Lord of the Throne

    "Rab Al-'Arsh" means "The Lord of the Throne." The Throne was explained above in Verse of the Chair (Ayatul Kursi).

  • This Good Name of God was mentioned five times in the Holy Quran in 21: 22; 23: 86; 23: 116; 27: 26; 43: 82;

  • 111. Rab Al-Samawat Wal Ardh (pronouced as-samawat): The Lord of the Heavens and the Earth

    "Rab Al-Samawat Wal Ardh" means "The Lord of the Heavens and the Earth."

    This Good Name of God was mentioned eight times in the Holy Quran, in 13: 6; 17: 102; 19: 65; 21: 56; 26: 24; 37: 5; 43: 82 and 45: 36.

    112. Rab Al-Samawat Wal Ardh Wama Baynahuma: The Lord of the Heavens. the Earth, and What's in Between Them

    "Rab Al-Samawat Wal Ardh Wama Baynahuma" means "The Lord of the Heavens. the Earth, and What's in Between Them."

    This Good Name of God was mentioned six times in the Holy Quran, in 19: 65; 26: 24; 35: 5; 38: 66; 44: 7 and 78: 37.

    113. Rab Al-Mashariq Wal Magharib: The Lord of the (Suns) Rises and the (Suns) Sets

    "Rab Al-Mashariq Wal Magharib" means "The Lord of the (Suns) Rises and the (Suns) sets." This is a reference to the sun rise and the sun set. Because it is used here in the plural form, it can be interpreted as a reference to the rises and sets of other suns, in other solar systems in the Universe.

    Ib Katheer was the closest to this interpretation referring to the rises and sets of "planets" (he did not mention "suns") as we see them in the sky every night.

    Al-Qurtubi interpreted the plurality as the number of rises and sets the Sun does every year, that is the number of the days in a year (365 days), where the Sun rises from a different position and sets in a different position, day after day, all the year around.

    This Good Name of God was mentioned twice in the Holy Quran, once as the "Lord of the Rises," in 37: 5 and another as the "Lord of the Rises and the Sets," in 70: 40.

    114. Rab Al-Mashriqayn Wa Rab Al-Maghribayn: The Lord of the Two (Suns) Rises and the Lord of the Two (Suns) Sets

    "Rab Al-Mashriqayn Wa Rab AlMaghribayn" means "The Lord of the Two (Suns) Rises and the Lord of the Two (Suns) sets."

    This Good Name of God was Verse 17 of Surat Al-Ra'hman (Chapter 55) of the Holy Quran.

    Ibn Katheer interpreted the word "Two" as a reference to the rises and sets of the Sun and the Moon.

    Al-Qurtubi interpreted the word "Two" as a reference to the longest and the shortest days of the year.

    Al-Tabari interpreted the word "Two" as those in the Summer and the Winter, representing the two extreme positions of rising and setting in a year.

    115. Rab Al-'Alameen: The Lord of the Worlds

    "Rab Al-'Alameen" means "The Lord of the Worlds." The "Worlds" means that Allah, praise to Him, is the Lord of all Worlds of Heavens, Earth, and what is in between them, as He described Himself in His Good Name Number 97, and as Moussa (Moses), peace and blessings of God be upon him, answered the Pharaoh in 26: 23-24.

    The four renouned Islamic scholars interpreted the "Worlds" as those of intelligent beings in the Heavens, the Earth, and in between, such as humans, jins, and angels, who can understand the Message of God.

    This Good Name of God was mentioned ninety-three times in the Holy Quran, as in 1: 2; 2: 131; 5: 28.

    116. Shadeedul Mu'hal: The Utmost in Power and Capability, was mentioned in Verse 13 of Surat Al-Ra'ad (Chapter 13) of the Holy Quran.

    117. Ahlut Taqwa (The Source of Piety and Righteousness), as a Good Name of God, was mentioned once in Verse 56 of Surat Al-Muddathir (Chpater 74) of the Holy Quran.

    ***

    Attributes of God, Concluded from the Holy Quran and the Sunna

    Some authors have constructed Attributes for God on the basis of verses in the Holy Quran, which describe God's actions, capabilities, or attributes, as adjectives or verbs. However, these are not God's descriptions of Himself directly, as He did in the case of the above list of His Good Names in the Holy Quran.

    The following list of God's Attributes have been found in some lists, which claim them as Good Names of God. However, this author describes them as Attributes of God because they are not directly mentioned in the Holy Quran as Good Names of God. The interpretations, translations, and verse citations are all the sole responsibility of this author.

    1. "Al-Jaleel" which means "The Majestic," an Attribute of God concluded from His Good Name of "Dhul-Jalali wal-Ikram," which means "The One to Whom Belongs the Majesty and Generosity. That Good Name of Allah was mentioned twice in the Holy Quran, in 55: 27 and 55: 78.

    2. "Al-'Hakam" which means "The Judge," an Attribute of God concluded from His Good Name of "Al-'Hakeem," mentioned above as number 34.

    3. "Al-'Adl," which means "The Just," an Attribute of God concluded from several verses in the Holy Quran commanding justice. In Verse 16: 95, God describes Himself as "Commanding Justice," and in another Verse (6: 115), He describes His word as "Truthful and Just."

    4. "Al-Ba'ith," which means "The Resurrector," an Attribute of God concluded from His promise to "resurrect" people for the Day of Judgment. This verb was mentioned in several verses in the Holy Quran, such as 22: 7; 6: 36; and 64: 7.  

    5. "Al-Mu'hsee," which means "The Counter," an Attribute of God concluded from the verb / a'hsa /, which means "to count," mentioned in three verses in the Holy Quran, in 19: 94; 58: 6; and 72: 28.

    6. "Al-Wajid" which means "The Finder," an Attribute of God concluded from the verb / wajada / , which means "to find," mentioned in one verse, associated to God, in the Holy Quran, in 93: 6.

    7. "Al-Majid" which means "The Glorious," an Attribute of God concluded from the verb / majada /, "to glorify," which is the same root verb of the Good Name of God, "Al-Majeed."

    8. "Al-Muqsit" which means "The Just in Judgment," an Attribute of God concluded from three verses in which God describes Himself as "He loves those who are just in judgment," in 5: 42; 49: 9; and 60: 8. In Verse 3: 18, a verb is used to describe God's upholding of justice.

    9. "Al-Mughni" which means "The Enricher," an Attribute of God concluded from verses in which God is described as the One Who enriches, as in 4: 130; 9: 28; 24: 32; and 24: 33. This Attribute shares the same root verb as the Good Name of God, "Al-Ghaniy."

    10. "Al-Badi" which means "The First Creator," an Attribute of God concluded from thirteen verses, in which verbs refer to God as He began the creation and He is the One Who begins the creation then He is capable to begin it again, as in 7: 29; 9: 13; and 10: 4.

    11. "Al-Nafi'u" (pronounce an-nafi'u), which means "The Beneficial," an Attribute of God concluded from several verses as in 48: 11; 22: 12; 10: 18; and 25: 55, in which God is described as the One Who benefits or allows somebody to benefit.

    12. "Al-Dhur" which means "The Harmer," an Attribute of God concluded from several verses as in 48: 11; 22: 12; 10: 18; and 25: 55, in which God is described as the One Who harms or allows somebody to be harmed.

    13. "Al-Qabidh," which means "The Gripper," Who will hold the Earth in His Grip (39: 67), and Who opens and closes His Grip with resources as He wills (2: 245).

    14. "Al-Basit," which means "The Expander or Enlarger of Sustenance or Provision," according to His Will. This Attribute of God is concluded from the verb, "yabsutu," mentioned in ten verses of the Holy Quran, as in 2: 245; 13; 26; and 17: 30.

    15. "Al-Mani'u" which means "The Shielder" or "The Preventer," an Attribute of God concluded from two verses mentioned in the Holy Quran (21: 43 and 59: 2), which state that nothing can "shield" people or "prevent them from being harmed" except God.

    16. "Al-Rasheed" which means "The Wise Guide," an Attribute of God concluded from six verses in the Holy Quran, in which people are told to seek guidance from God. These verses are 2: 186; 21: 51; 18: 10; 19: 24; 72: 10; and  18: 17.

    17. "Al-Rafi'u" (pronounced as ar-rafi'u), which means "The Exalter," or "The Elevator," The One Who raises or lifts up the rank of  whoever He wills. This Attribute of God comes from the same root verb of the Good Name of God, "Rafee'u Al-Darajat."

    Though it is not directly mentioned in the Holy Quran, it is concluded from the description of God as the One who raises, exalts, elevates, or lifts up the rank of His Messengers (6: 83 for Ibrahim, 12: 76 for Yousuf, 19: 57; 3: 55; 4: 158 for Jesus, 94: 4 for Muhammed, pbb upon them), His Books (80: 14), and the believers (6: 165; 43: 32; 58: 11).

    It is also concluded from the description of God as the One Who lifted up the heavens (13: 2; 79: 28; 55: 7; 88: 28; 52: 5), the Sinai Tour Mountain (2: 63; 2: 93; 4: 154), and His houses of worship (24: 36).

    18.  "Al-Mu'iz" which means "The Honorer," The One Who gives honor or esteem to whoever He wills. This Attribute of God is concluded from six verses in the Holy Quran about Him as having "All Honor," in 4: 139; 10: 65; 35: 10; 37: 180; 63: 8; and 38: 82.

    19. "Al-Mudhil" which means "The Dishonorer," or "The Humiliator," of whoever He wills. This Attribute of God is concluded from some verses in the Holy Quran about Him as does not need saints or patrons to protect Him from humiliation, as nonbelievers falsely claimed (17: 111) and about humiliated nonbelievers in the Day of Judgment (58: 20; 68: 43; 70: 44).

    20. Al-Mumeet which means "The One Who causes the death of every living being." This Attribute of God is concluded from fourteen verses expressing it in the present tense, such as in 2: 28; 2: 258; and 3: 156, and four verses expressing it in the past tense, in 2: 259; 53: 44; 80: 21; and 40: 11. 

    21. "Al-Muqaddim," means "The Warner in Advance," The One Who has warned people in advance through His Messengers to be good in this life in order to get His reward and avoid His punishment in the Hereafter. This Attribute of God was mentioned once in the form of a verb in the past tense in 50: 28.

    22. "Al-Mu.akh-khir," means "The Delayer," The One Who puts the disobedient and non-believers last in the line of His mercy. This Attribute of God was mentioned as a verb in the present tense, once in 14: 42 in reference to delaying the punishment of the non-believers until the Day of Judgment and six times in 14: 10; 16: 61; 35: 45; 63: 11; and 71: 4 (twice) in reference to delaying death until a specific time for each person.

    23. "Al-Mubdi' " means "The Originator of Creation," an Attribute of God concluded from 11 verses in the Holy Quran, in which it was mentioned 12 times in present and past tense forms, in 7: 29; 10: 4; 10: 34 (twice); 21: 104; 27: 64; 29: 19; 29: 20; 30: 11; 30: 27; 32: 7; and 85: 13..

    24. "Al-Mu'eed" means "The Repeater of Creation," The One Who repeats His creation by bringing back His creatures from the dead for judgment. This Attribute of God is concluded from 12 verb forms in 11 verses, in 7: 29; 10: 4; 10: 34 (twice); 17: 51; 20: 29; 21: 104; 27: 64; 29: 19; 30: 11; 30: 27; and 85: 13.

    25. "Al-Munshi' " means "The Establisher," an Attribute of God concluded from Verses 36:79 in reference to His establishment of the second life. It is also concluded from about 24 other verses in different verb and noun forms, as in 6: 6, 98, 133; 11:61; 13: 12; 23:14, 31, 42; 53:32; 56: 61, 72. 56:72; and 67:23.

     

    Two Attributes, used by other authors, but have not been found by this author as related to words describing God in the Holy Quran.

    1. "Al-Saboor," which means "The Patient." This Attribute is concluded from many verses in the Holy Quran, in which patience is mentioned as a characteristic of the Messengers of God (as in 6: 34 and 46: 35) and the believers (as in 13: 22 and 16: 42). However, this author has not found that this attribute is related to God, according to the Holy Quran.

    2. "Al-Khafidh," which means "The Debaser," The One Who lowers whoever He wills. This Attribute is concluded from a verb mentioned twice in the Holy Quran (15: 88 and 26: 215), which commands "lowering one's wing" to parents and to believers, meaning to be kind to them. In a third verse (56: 3). The Day of Judgment is also mentioned as the Day in which people are either "lowered" or "lifted up," according to their deeds. However, this author has not found that this attribute is related to God, according to the Holy Quran.


    Notes:

    *  The Arabic text of the cited verses of the Holy Quran in this article is copied from http://quran.al-islam.com, www.tanzil.com and www.quranexplorer.com .

     { 1 The Interpretation of the verses of the Holy Quran, mentioned in this article, is primarily based on the works of the four early prominent Islamic scholars, known for their interpretations of the Holy Quran. These are Al-Tabari (Died in 310 Hijriya), Al-Qurtubi (Died in 671 Hijriya), Ibn Katheer (Died in 774 Hijriya), and Al-Siyouti (849-911 Hijriya, 1445-1505). They employ their knowledge of Arabic as well as their comprehensive knowledge of the Holy Quran, using verses in one context to explain other verses in other contexts. Their most important contribution, though, is including explanations from the Hadith of the Prophet, peace and blessings of God be upon him, and from his companions, may Allah be pleased with them. Complete works of these scholars are published at the official website of the Saudi Arabian Ministry of Islamic affairs, which can be accessed at: http://quran.al-islam.com .

    Though this author benefited from the works of all of the four scholars in writing this article, may Allah reward all of them, he benefited most from the wonderful work of Al-Qurtubi, who wrote a two-volume book (Al-Asna) about the Good Names of Allah. See endnote # 4.

    Moreover, this author has benefited tremendously from the wonderful works of a website called Tanzil, "Revelation" ( http://tanzil.net/#1:1). This website has a search function which allows users to find any word in the Holy Quran, giving statistics about it, and providing 13 English  translations of the Holy Quran, in addition to translations to other languages. Moreover, Tanzil provides Quran recitations for 18 famous Arabic reciters, one English, and two Persians, allowing a continuous recitation of the Holy Quran. May Allah give those who have founded, contributed to, and operated this website the best of rewards here and in the Hereafter.

    Though this author consulted with the interpretations of these renowned scholars and translators, the translation of the meanings of the Quranic verses as well as the interpretations related to them in this and other articles are his sole responsibility.

    The name of Bin Katheer can also be written as Ibn Katheer. In either case, it means the son of Katheer, like in English with Jackson, which meant originally the son of Jack. The rule in Arabic is writing it as Ibn if it is used with one name, like Ibn Katheer. However, it is written as Bin if it comes between two names, like Muhammed Bin Ahmed.

     { 2 There are three Arabic vowels and their three strong forms (Tanween, i.e. adding "N"). The first is the Fat'ha, which maybe expressed in English by the sound / a /, with its strong form of / an /. The second is the Kassra, which maybe expressed by the sound / i /, with its strong form of / in /. The third Arabic vowel is the Dhamma, which maybe expressed by the sound / u /, with its strong form of / un /.

    Following Arabic grammatical rules, a common name such as "Ahmed" (or Ahmad) maybe written and pronounced as Ahmada, Ahmadan, Ahmadi, Ahmadin, Ahmadu, and Ahmadun.

    While all these six vowel forms are written in the Arabic text of the Holy Quran, not all of them are pronounced in recitation, particularly at the end of each verse. However, they maybe pronounced when several verses are continuously recited.

    Arabic written words are mainly composed of consonants, vowels are added as symbols over or under a letter, as in the case of the text of the Holy Quran. However, in books and written media, only basic consonants and essential vowels are written as letters. No vowel symbols are added, as it is expected from an average educated Arabic speaker to know how to pronounce the words without vowel symbols.

     { 3 Underlined letters in the Quran transliteration

    Some Arabic letters and sounds have no counterparts in the English alphabet and the English phonetic transcription. There are nine Arabic sounds which have no equivalence in the English alphabet. These are (    ). Some translators underline the closest English letters to these Arabic letters, in order to tell readers that these are pronounced differently in Arabic. The closest sounds expressing the Arabic letters in parentheses, from right to left, are ( h, kh, s, dh, t, tdh, a, gh, q ). However, underlining them as ( h, kh, s, dh, t, tdh, a, gh, q ) conveys the message that these are different from the English sounds expressed by the letters of the English alphabet.

    The two Arabic letters and sounds of Tha ( ) and Dhal (   ), expressed by the two English letters "th" at the beginning of the English words "three" and "that," are transliterated  as / th / and / th /, respectively.

    This author uses this same method of underlining these letters, with the exception of the two Arabic letters expressed by the / h / and / a / sounds. Instead of underlining them, he adds an apostrophe before the letter to become / 'h / and / 'a / respectively. Using an apostrophe instead of underling a letter is for practical reasons only. First, these two letters are more frequently used than the other letters in the list. Second, it is easier to use the apostrophe on keyboards than adding underlining after writing.

    As an example, an apostrophe is used before the English letter / a / to express the eighteenth letter of the Arabic alphabet / 'ayn /, as in the case of translating the Good Name of God, Al-'Azeez, the tenth on the list.

    An apostrophe is also used before the English letter / h / to express the sixth letter of the Arabic alphabet / 'ha /, as in the case of translating the Good Name of God, Al-A'had,  

    The above usage of an apostrophe to help express the Arabic sound / 'a / may not be enough if the sound occurs at the end of a word, such as in the case of the Good Name of God, number 30, "Al-Samee'u." This Good Name of God is pronounced as "Al-Samee' " without conjugation. However, because the sound / 'a / occurs at the end of the word, the pronunciation may become distorted as / as-samee'a / instead of / as-samee ' /. As a solution, this author is using the conjugated form of the noun as a subject to become / as-samee'u /, the closest to the Arabic pronunciation.

     { 4 } .   Some of the websites which provide the Good Names of Allah with explanation and interpretation

    As the index (webpage # 6 below) shows, there are so many websites which address the topic, providing translations and explanations for the Good Names of Allah. Here are just five of them:

     i. Al-Asna fi shar'h Al-Asma il Husna  (A book in Arabic devoted to the explanation of God's Good Names by Muhammed Bin Ahmed Al-Qurtubi (died in 671 H), one of the renowned four Muslim scholars honored in this article), available online, pages can be zoomed to readable size. The first 52 pages represent an introduction to the book, written by a group of scholars who brought the Qurtubi's book to the printed form. It can be found accessed freely at:

    http://www.archive.org/details/asnaa_asmaa_alla

    The book is also published in PDF, can be downloaded in its entirety from:

    http://www.4shared.com/get/QvcGeWF-/________.html

     ii. Al-Moojaz fi Ma'arifat Asma illahil Husna (The Concise in Konwing God's Good Names), in Arabic, By Sami Bin Abdullah Bin Abdul Rahman Al-Sunaid, at: http://come2allah.com/main_Body.htm# 

     iii. Ya Beyrouth Arabic website contains a page for God's Good Names, with explanation and verse citation but without giving credit to the author of this great effort. http://www.yabeyrouth.com/pages/index738.htm 

     iv. Image Shack website provides one-word translation for each of the Good Names of Allah:

    http://img383.imageshack.us/f/99namesofallahbyrzap9.jpg/  (Large and readable page).

     v.  Faizani provides translations and short explanations, at:   http://www.faizani.com/articles/names.html

     vi. Bing index of the Good Names of Allah (for all entries about the subject):

    http://www.bing.com/search?q=good+names+of+Allah&form=HPNTDF&pc=HPNTDF&src=IE-SearchBox

     

     { 5 }  The famous list of the 99 Names of God, in Arabic, which includes many Attributes (Not Names), as explained above in the last section of this article

     

     

     

    An English list of the 99 Names of God, which follows the above Arabic list (which includes some Attributes, not Names):
    ImageShack, share photos, pictures, free image hosting, free video hosting, image hosting, video hosting, photo image hosting site, video hosting site

     { 6 } . Statistics about the number of times the Good Names of God are mentioned in the Arabic Holy Quran are based on search results from the Tanzil website, at  http://tanzil.net/#1:1 and the Holy Quran Index in Arabic by Muhammed Fuad Abdul Baqi. Cairo: Dar Al-Fikr. 1406 (1986). The Arabic Title of the index is: Al-Muajam Al-Mufahras Li Alfadh Al-Quran Al-Kareem.

    Because of the Arabic grammatical rules, a noun, an adjective, or a verb may take many forms in relation to tense and pronouns. This means that the number of times of the Good Names of God mentioned in this article is not an exhaustive number. Thus, mentioning the number of times a Good Name of God occurs in the Holy Quran is meant to document that it is really mentioned first, then to give readers an idea about how much the Name was frequently mentioned. There is no claim that these numbers are exclusive.

     

    ====================================

    * Dr. Hassan Ali El-Najjar has a Ph.D. in Sociology and a Masters degree in Cultural Anthropology from the University of Georgia, USA. He is also a native speaker of Arabic. He was born in Gaza, Palestine, in 1369 Hijriya, 1950 AD.

    Opinions expressed in various sections are the sole responsibility of their authors and they may not represent Al-Jazeerah's.

    editor@aljazeerah.info